Attacking paper tigers

I’ve now watched two episodes of Aaron Sorkin’s new show, Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip. Well, to be completely honest, I sort of watched two episodes, sinced I slept through most of the second.

The show has the usual Sorkin trademarks — incredibly rapid-fire dialogue, some of it clever; a camera that likes to spin and zoom; and speeches, lots of speeches. This time, the speeches meld Sorkin’s two primary concerns: studio control over show content and Evangelical Christians.

In Sorkin’s world, the studios are constantly bowing down to the Evangelical Christians and bleaching “cutting edge” content from the brilliant work done by writers and directors. Sorkin is remarkably unconcerned by the fact that the studios are business-making entities and that their obligation to their shareholders isn’t to be cutting edge, but is to appeal to the greatest number of advertisers — which means attracting, not attacking, the largest audience demographic.

In the 24 hour a day cable world, if Sorkin has something burning to say, he can find a venue. As it is, despite his attacks on the studios, NBC seems happily to have assumed the martyr’s roll of hosting a show savaging its own approach to TV (although I’m sure the network bigwigs console themselves with the thought that, since they’re hosting the show, NBC must be considered a network that doesn’t pander in the way Sorkin describes).

In any event, as Sorkin constantly flexes his puny muscles with his brave attacks on Christians, I can’t help but think of my own recent American Thinker article about the Democrats’ horror of being on the receiving end of a verbal challenge to their ideas. You see, that’s what this whole Studio 60 is about: How dare those Evangelical Christians use market power in a capitalist economy to say I’m not brilliant? Further, how dare they challenge my attack against them?

I’d be much more impressed with Sorkin’s freedom of speech positioning if, instead of attacking Evangelical Christians who, for the most part, merely huff and puff about his inanities, he’d throw in a few Mohammed jokes or perhaps have a cutting-edge joke two about burkhas, honor killings, submission, free speech riots, etc.  Attacking paper tigers is scarcely the way to make the point about freedom of speech in a dangerous world.  But, as we well know, because the Kennedys, Trumans and Roosevelts are long gone, the Democrats’ enemies of choice are always the paper tigers who won’t fight back.

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Comments

  1. erp says

    On a positive note, we watched the first episode of “Shark” with James Woods and liked it. We thought it was similar to “House,” but with a legal rather than a medical background.

    The second episode is on tape awaiting our pleasure. We’ll probably watch it over the weekend. What surprised us is that it’s directed by Spike Lee and yet my always honed antenna for PC claptrap wasn’t alerted.

    Maybe Spike sees the handwriting on the wall and wants to become mainstream now. That would be good. He’s a very talented guy and it would be a shame if he didn’t get the chip off his shoulder.

  2. mamapajamas says

    You see, that’s what this whole Studio 60 is about: How dare those Evangelical Christians use market power in a capitalist economy to say I’m not brilliant? Further, how dare they challenge my attack against them?

    I think there would be a lot less fuss about this if the current “complaints” about Evangelical Christians looked a lot less like runamuck bigotry.

    One of the problems involved here is that a lot more people belong to Evangelical churches than even THEY know. Most of the people who ARE Evangelicals don’t KNOW they’re Evangelicals.

    The ACTUAL definition of “Evangelical” churches are those churches that concentrate on teaching the life of Christ as presented by the Four Evangelists, Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John (get it? The “Four Evangelists”? “Evangelical”?). That is the ONE AND ONLY CORRECT definition. These churches include the Baptists (which includes perhaps 70% of US Blacks), the Methodists, the Presbyterians, the Pentacostals, and the Great Grandaddy of them all, the Church of England and it’s various flavors (Episcopalian US, Anglican elsewhere). It also includes a number of smaller sects, like the Charismatics, who are very VERY… uh… strange, in my opinion, and other groups like Jerry Fallwell’s gang.

    In other words, “Evangelicals” are REALLY pretty much mainstream Protestants.

    As for the Church of England, that little factoid would probably shock the hell out of the BBC, the Guardian, etc etc etc, who have spent the last 5 1/2 years tsk tsking that the US has fallen prey to those nasty Evangelicals!– given that a good 80% of the good people of England belong to or are in families of the Church of England.

    Today, “Evangelical” has become something of a swear word… and definitely a “sneer” word. The definition of the word has been changed to mean something like “fundamentalist fascists”, and has become one of the few unprotected ethnic groups. People who think of the word “Evangelical” today automatically think of people like Jerry Fallwell and the Charismatics “speaking in tounges”, etc.

    It saddens me to see the definition changed without so much as a by-your-leave from the REAL Evangelical churches! It also saddens me that most Evangelicals don’t know they’re Evangelicals.

    A sign of the times… (sigh!)… and obviously orchestrated bigotry!

  3. Trimegistus says

    I think Studio 60 is another symptom of the Left’s continuing retreat from reality. In the 1990s they wanted a liberal President who wasn’t corrupt, so they came up with West Wing. They want to murder Bush, so they get Death of a President. They wanted Hillary, only not corrupt and Shrewish, so we get COmmander in Chief. Now they want to believe they are courageous and fighting for truth — so we get Studio 60.

    Eventually they will exist in an entirely fictional reality. Some might say they’ve been there for years, but at least now they won’t be trying to impose their fictional ideas on the real world.

  4. mamapajamas says

    Trim: Some might say they’ve been there for years, but at least now they won’t be trying to impose their fictional ideas on the real world.

    Uh… actually, this IS already happening. The entire point of having those programs representing their dearest dreams is to make them a “common sense” idea. The more exposure to the public these ideas have… but only in a controlled environment where THEY write the script and decide that it turns out that the Evangelical preacher is really a closet homosexual and not the dear straight man his flock thinks… the more “normal” it looks.

    How many people do YOU know who virtually spit out the word “Evangelical”?

  5. mamapajamas says

    Whoops… hit the submit before I meant to.

    (ahem… )

    How many people do YOU know who virtually spit out the word “Evangelical”? I know dozens of them, and a LOT of them are Southern Baptists!

  6. Zhombre says

    Erp: Spike Lee IMHO always has been mainstream and very very slick. He did Nike commercials. He’s basically a poseur. Betcha he loves the hype and ‘tude he generates, is very self conscious about it, and loves the money in his bank account.

  7. says

    Attacking paper tigers is scarcely the way to make the point about freedom of speech in a dangerous world.

    How dare you say that the moral high ground doesn’t give extreme benefits.

    Pacifism dictates that we not get into fights. We would lose our purity should we engage in base mud wrestling fights with Islam, and it would only create more strife and chaos. Your path lies death and destruction, peaceful argument is the way of the righteous. How more peaceful may we get, than arguing with those who won’t fight back? That is the best way to stop a war or a fight, from occuring. One side refuses to fight back. Therein lies the path to moral purity.

  8. jg says

    MamaPJ: You are on to something. TV land–as the discussion brings up– is delusional in content. But delusion can become reality, if enough of us accept the delusion.

    It’s the whole rationale for the MSM, their only ballgame.

    Your narrative on the nature of Evangelicals is well done.

  9. jg says

    One further note:
    My comments about delusion were also sparked by this provocative insight from Trimegistus:

    “Eventually they will exist in an entirely fictional reality. Some might say they’ve been there for years, but at least now they won’t be trying to impose their fictional ideas on the real world.”

  10. says

    I agree about Studio 60 and about Shark. I thought Shark was surprisingly nuanced and just plain fun – and the surprise was partly just because it’s network tv and partly because of Spike Lee, as mentioned. I tried to watch Studio 60’s third episode and just couldn’t slog through. Clever dialogue just doesn’t substitute for actual thought, sadly. Maybe I’ll just watch House and Shark more than once each week.

Trackbacks

  1. [...] As you know from an earlier post I did, Sorkin’s hostility to “Right Wing” Christians is pathetic and pathological. His lack of courage — that is, his picking on an easy target that he knows won’t strike back — was again evident in this week’s show. I don’t even have to waste time summarizing the plot, which was vapid and turgid. It’s enough to know that Studio 60 is a show about making a sketch comedy akin to Saturday Night Life (”SNL”). The big enemies are Bush, the network, and “Right Wing” Christians. Bush is dangerous to the country; while the network and those pesky Christians keep trying to mess with the heroes’ job security (as well as to stifle free speech, of course). [...]

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