Our Marines

I had a rare Marin Marine sighting today in Target.  Indeed, we got two, in dress uniform, who happily spent a few minutes talking to the kids and me, explaining their ribbons and talking about the many places they’ve been.  One of them said that his only regret is that he hasn’t yet had the chance to serve in Iraq.  I was able to give both of them a heartfelt thank you, both for their kindness to my kids, and their service to my country.  You go, guys!

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  1. Trish Olsen says

    It’s great that you actually spoke to them & expressed your appreciation — & what a wonderful example/experience for your kids! A simple “thank you” seems to mean so much to them; you can generally see it in their eyes. What’s always surprised ME, however, is later in the day — when YOU become the recipient of warm-fuzzies just recalling the encounter. Plus, Marines always look soooo handsome in those dress uniforms, don’t they? Wow! Talk about American pride!

  2. says

    Not every Marine can get tested in battle. Primarily cause according to the Left, we are overstretched, so cannot risk injuring our lovable military men and women, by deploying them to too many places now.

    That is not how you treat a weapon, but how you treat pets. I’m sure if they stay in the service long enough, they’ll get a crack at Syria or Iran.

  3. T.S. says

    Not every Marine can get tested in battle. Primarily cause according to the Left, we are overstretched, so cannot risk injuring our lovable military men and women, by deploying them to too many places now.

    That is not how you treat a weapon, but how you treat pets. I’m sure if they stay in the service long enough, they’ll get a crack at Syria or Iran. – Ymar

    You speak with such certainty, Ymar, but I just read this today:

    There’s something happening here
    A new protest movement inside the military — including active-duty soldiers back from Iraq — is calling on Congress to end the war immediately.

    By Mark Benjamin

    Nov. 02, 2006 | An extraordinary full-page antiwar ad appeared in the Sunday edition of the New York Times on Nov. 9, 1969. In it, 1,366 active-duty U.S. service members signed a statement calling for an end to the war in Vietnam. The signatures represented a tiny minority of the 3.5 million troops serving on active duty then — but behind those signatures was a groundswell of dissent inside the military. With the Vietnam adventure sliding into an abyss, that dissent would become more apparent as an Army that included many conscripts faced ugly resistance from within: soldiers disobeying orders, deserting, using drugs, and even “fragging” their own officers with grenades.

    Today, there are echoes of the Vietnam experience in the protracted Iraq war — including a growing protest movement in the military. Its trappings are starkly different this time. Rather than insubordination and violence, it has formed around a form-letter campaign, presumably conducted within the bounds of military regulations that restrict what soldiers are allowed to say. Last week, a group of current troops, with support from a handful of antiwar organizations, announced plans to petition Congress with a collection of “appeals for redress,” which call for an immediate withdrawal from Iraq. They had 65 signatures from active-duty troops and reservists.

    Since then, the effort has quietly swelled to nearly 500 troops, and continues to grow. Organizers, including 22-year-old Marine Sgt. Liam Madden, say they are currently working to validate the identities of several hundred more troops who have signed on, and will send the validated collection of letters to the soldiers’ respective congressional representatives in January.

    The group already includes 76 officers, four of whom are colonels. And while that number is also quite small in comparison to the 1.4 million troops now on active duty, some participants and observers expect it will continue to grow rapidly, exposing significant and expanding disillusionment with the war in Iraq among the rank and file.

    For More:

    http://fairuse.100webcustomers.com/fairenough/salon032.html

  4. says

    Which means more slots should open up in Iraq soon enough for those eager and desiring a challenge.

    exposing significant and expanding disillusionment with the war in Iraq among the rank and file.

    You are talking to a true believer, TS. Your propaganda cannot pierce the veil of belief, it never will. While people are “disillusioned” with their beliefs and causes, they will be strong enough, as those with true belief in their hearts and minds.

    One of the few ways to defeat a true believer, is to make him stop believing. But that goal is so hard to accomplish, that it takes a lot more than petitions or salon032 htmls.

    They had 65 signatures from active-duty troops and reservists.

    Since then, the effort has quietly swelled to nearly 500 troops, and continues to grow.

    So last time they checked, they had 65 guys wanting to leave. Okay.

  5. T.S. says

    Correction, those with disillusioned beliefs, will not be strong enough compared to those with true belief.- Ymar

    I dont know. During the Vietnam war, those with disillusioned belief made quite an impact.

    This is the key passage from the Salon.com article:

    “And while that number is also quite small in comparison to the 1.4 million troops now on active duty, some participants and observers expect it will continue to grow rapidly, exposing significant and expanding disillusionment with the war in Iraq among the rank and file.”

    Will the disillusionment grow rapidly as some predict? Or will these same soldiers be happy to hop on over to Syria and Iran, as you say? Only time will tell

    And yes, I’ve heard Salon.com can’t be trusted. In fact, in March, 2002, one full year before the war in Iraq began, they published this:

    “The whole weapons inspection issue is really just a ruse. The real agenda of the Bush administration is a regime change. . . It has nothing to do with the U.N. or weapons inspectors or even human rights.” — Denis Halliday

    That was considered just plain bonky back then, but it sure does ring true now.

  6. says

    I dont know. During the Vietnam war, those with disillusioned belief made quite an impact.

    They got true believers to stop believing. Best way to defeat someone you cannot overpower. Make them believe that they are already defeated.

    But irregardless, your desires for defeat in this war, will bear no fruit. Because now, the Left no longer has tactica or strategic surprise, and the Left’s logistics are also very very short compared to their campaign in Vietnam.

    Or will these same soldiers be happy to hop on over to Syria and Iran, as you say? Only time will tell

    The article tells it for you, not time. You already think it is going one way, time is not going to tell anything to you that you don’t already know.

  7. T.S. says

    But irregardless, your desires for defeat in this war, will bear no fruit- Ymar

    I desire the truth, Ymar, whatever that is. Can lopsided certainty uncover the truth? Not usually. But it’s fascinating to read those who are so certain of their position despite ample evidence otherwise.

    After the election, James Baker’s report will finally be made public. It reportedly says that the war in Iraq cannnot be won.

    Even so, I expect the “Do you want to win this war”? meme to continue – at least until it becomes as unfashionable as “stay the course.”

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