Exposing the BBC’s moral nakedness

Britain’s Anglican Church seems to be waking up, not just to the terrorists within England’s borders, but to the fifth column as well. Thus, the second most senior Anglican in England has launched a full frontal, no holds barred attack against the BBC for being (a) anti-Christian and (b) afraid of radical Islam. While he was at it, he took a swipe at veils, too:

The Archbishop of York, Dr John Sentamu, has accused the BBC of bias against Christianity and says the broadcaster fears a terrorist backlash if it is critical of Islam.

The archbishop, the second most senior figure in the Church of England’s hierarchy, said Christians took “more knocks” than other faiths at the hands of the BBC.

“They can do to us what they dare not do to the Muslims,” he said. “We are fair game because they can get away with it. We don’t go down there and say, ‘We are going to bomb your place.’ That is not in our nature.”

The Ugandan-born archbishop nevertheless said Christians must be more forceful in promoting their beliefs.

Blaming the “chattering classes” for undermining trad-itional Christian culture, he said: “They see themselves as holding the flag for Britain and that Britain is definitely secular and atheist. I want them to have their say but not to lord it over the rest of us.”

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Dr Sentamu rejected the idea of the Church severing its remaining ties with the state. “People of other faiths say to me that the Church establishment is critical because it is a bulwark against a secularising agenda,” he said.

“The Church of England reminds the nation that in this country the Queen is Defender of the Faith, head of the Commonwealth and head of state.” The Queen, he added, was the “real uniting force” and no politician “could ever rise to her level”.

Dr Sentamu also questioned whether Muslim women were required to wear the veil by the Koran, and argued that those who did should not expect British society to be reordered to accommodate them.

He said Muslim scholars would say three things about the veil. “First, does it conform to norms of decency? Secondly, does it render you more secure? And thirdly, what kind of Islam are you projecting by wearing it?

“I think in the British context it renders you less secure because you stick out and it brings unwelcome attention.

“On the first question (of whether the veil conforms to norms of decency) I don’t think it does conform.”

The archbishop said he never wore a cross when visiting a synagogue or mosque, explaining: “Because I am going into someone else’s home. And I can’t simply say, ‘Take me as I am, whether you like it or not.’

“I think the thing is in British society you can wear what you want, but you can’t expect British society to be reconfigured around you. No minority can expect to impose this on the public or civic life.”

A BBC spokesman declined to comment but referred to a newspaper article by Mark Thompson, the director general, which denied that the BBC was systematically biased against Christianity and in favour of Islam, saying that it did not square with the facts.

Hurrah! I do rather wonder whether Dr. Sentamu’s moral bravery is aided by the fact that he’s not a leeched out, bleached out Brit, but came of age in the vibrant African church.

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Comments

  1. Danny Lemieux says

    As an American Anglican (i.e., Episcopalian), I, too, say “hurrah”. If only our American church had half the spine of the Good Bishop Sentamu in standing up for the faith. Actually, we are taking many lessons from our African brethren these days – the Nigerian church, for example, has been in the vanguard of protecting Christian values against the Islamo-fascist onslaught. Good for them!

  2. Al says

    It is about time a second religous leader spoke up to question issues with Islam. The first of course was Pope Benedict. More should follow. Also as an Episcopalian, I am mildly dismayed that the good Bishop Sentamu feels he should not wear his cross in a synagogue or mosque. He would be a man of faith entering a place of faith.
    Have to check out the York website
    Al

  3. Trimegistus says

    Dr. Sentamu also has the weapon of dark skin to use. The Beeb can’t be too vigorous in their response because, as we all know, any criticism of a dark-skinned person is racism. So they’re caught in a bind between their skin-color-based patronizing and their religion-based patronizing. Go, Dr. Sentamu!

  4. says

    The fact of the matter is Christians in Africa have been violently assaulted by Jihad for centuries. The Archbishop brings that history to England–he understands the enemy because he has intimate and history knowledge of Islamic conquest.

    In regard to American Christians, they are even further from Islamic conquest. Distance does facilitate that “it’s not my problem” attitude. The Roman Catholic in America is only now dealing with the damage done by the Radical Left take over of Vatican II. Rooting out the disease which changed the Priesthood from a sacramental life into a men’s club is going to take time.

    The one great moment will be when the RC Church has its first black pope.

  5. JJ says

    I’m sorry to say that it looks as though the C of E is reapng what it’s spent the last decades sowing. Bishop Sentamu is getting to the party a little late – undoubtedly because he is not from there.

    But active C of E membership is, these days, estimated to be about 2% of British society, which means trhere are a lot of empty churches most of the time. The Church has become such a big tent, and so understanding of everybody, that the inevitable end result is that it no longer stands for, or condemns, anything. Or, if it does, you need a microscope to find it.

    It’s been a joke on TV (ITV, too, not just the Beeb) going back at least thirty years (Monty Python; Yes, Minister; Two Ronnies; Black Adder; Some Mothers Do Have ‘Em; Steptoe & Son; etc., etc.) as to whether it’s even necessary in the C of E for a bishop to believe in God. The general conclusion has been: no.

    When you spend thirty years shooting yourself in the foot, and eliminating all standards to placate one pressure group or another – how surprising is it to find that eventually you have become the butt of everyone? Either of their jokes, or of their perfectly serious unkindly comments and attitudes?

    I wish the Bishop great good luck, but his colleagues and predecessors have put him in a hole of startling dimensions.

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