And yet more reasons for concern about a Huckabee candidacy

If you haven’t yet seen this Kimberly Strassel article, make the time to read it. Here’s a taste:

Mr. Huckabee is starting to get a look-see by the press, though whether the nation will have time to absorb the findings before the primaries is just as unknown. The small amount that has been unearthed so far ought to have primary voters nervous. It isn’t just that Mr. Huckabee is far from a traditional conservative; he’s a potential ethical time bomb.

On policy, Mr. Huckabee’s tenure in Arkansas has shown him to be ambivalent about tax increases, variously supporting sales tax hikes, cigarette and gasoline taxes and Internet taxes. Spending increased 65% from 1996 to 2004, three times the rate of inflation.

He’s so lackluster on education reform that he recently received an endorsement from the New Hampshire affiliate of the National Education Association–the first ever of a GOP candidate. The union cited Mr. Huckabee’s opposition to school vouchers. Mr. Huckabee is a fan of greater subsidies for farmers and “clean energy.” He’s proven himself a political neophyte on foreign policy, joining Democrats to skewer President Bush and glorify the “diplomacy, diplomacy, diplomacy” line.

Most of this is out there, thoroughly documented, and even now slowly filtering its way to voters. Of more concern is what has not yet been discovered about Mr. Huckabee’s time as Arkansas lieutenant governor and governor, in particular on ethical issues. There are signs that Mr. Huckabee’s background–borne of the same Arkansas establishment that produced Bill Clinton–is ripe to provide the sort of pop-up political scandal that could derail a general election campaign.

In Arkansas, Mr. Huckabee was investigated by the state ethics committee at least 14 times. Most of the complaints centered on what appears to be a serial disregard for government rules about gifts and outside financial compensation. He reported $112,000 worth of gifts in one year alone, nearly double his $67,000 salary.

Five of the 14 investigations resulted in admonishments: Two for failing to report gifts (one was later overturned), the other three for some $80,000 that Mr. Huckabee and his wife received but failed to initially report. One of these admonishments involved a $23,500 payment to Mr. Huckabee from an opaque organization called Action America that he helped found in 1994 while lieutenant governor, and that was designed to coordinate his speeches and supplement his income.

Mr. Huckabee caused an uproar when he used a $60,000 account intended to maintain the governor’s mansion for personal expenses, including restaurant meals, dry cleaning and boat supplies. He also faced a lawsuit over his assertion that $70,000 worth of furniture donated to the mansion was his to keep. Sprinkled among all this are complaints about the misuse of state planes and campaign funds, mistakes on financial disclosure forms, and fights over documents related to ethics investigations.

Any one of these episodes individually may appear penny ante, but they add up to a disturbing pattern. People I’ve spoken with who worked with Mr. Huckabee in Arkansas dispute the idea that he is “corrupt.” They instead ascribe his ethical mishaps to a “blind spot” rooted in his beginnings as a Baptist minister and a Southern culture of gift-giving; they suggest he never made the mental transition to public office.

Some will also argue Mr. Huckabee is no more ethically challenged than Mr. Giuliani, who is getting pounded with questions about Judith Nathan’s security detail and Giuliani Partner clients. The difference is that Hizzoner is a celebrity whose past bones were long ago picked clean by the media crows. Even the Nathan flap is an extension of news that made the rounds five years ago.

The obscure governor from Arkansas is, in contrast, a deep sea for media diving. Most recent have been stories about his pardons and commutations, as well as the news that R.J. Reynolds contributed to Action America. Mr. Huckabee–who now wants a national smoking ban in public places–responded that he never knew he accepted tobacco money, which has inspired a former adviser to claim Mr. Huckabee is being “less than truthful.” What’s next?

I’ve made clear my distaste with Huckabee.  Even for those who like him, though, they have to understand that there is almost no likelihood of his winning.  Despite the current excitement about him, his liberal stands on government spending, education, tax and foreign policy are going to alienate a large swath of conservatives and, despite those positions, his outspoken Christianity is going to repel most Democrats.  When the election finally rolls around, he’s be nowhere.

I want to win.  I hate the thought of a Democrat in the White House and think that we have a large number of completely excellent conservative candidates to sell to the American people:  Romney, Giuliani, Thompson and McCain.  It would be ludicrous if Huckabee, who is a liberal as regards everything but abortion and creationism, would front the Republican party.  November 2008 would be a lose/lose proposition since (a) he’d lose outright or (b) if he won, we’d have a repeat of either the Carter or the Clinton years.

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  • Eric Shirley

    I think the media is pushing the Republican candidate they think will be weakest in the general election. BTW, I enoyed your story in the American Thinker. I also clicked on to an earlier story “Confessions of a cryto-conservative” Although I am an open conservative I have been alienated from my father over my political beliefs for years now. I love the man dearly but there is a palpable strain in our relationship over my conservative beliefs. It can be a very long story so I will cut it short. I just enjoyed your writing and thought I would pass that along to you. I guessed your probably from Massachusetts somewhere but I may be wrong.
    God Bless and hand in there

    E.S.

  • Allen L.

    Whitewater Redux.

  • http://expreacherman.wordpress.com/ expreacherman

    Book,

    Interesting article.

    I will link to your post from my recent article on Huckabee.

    All this from my Conservative, Bible believing, retired Pastor point-of-view.

    ExP(Jack)

  • Pingback: What About Huckabee’s Christmas Ad? « Notes From A Retired Preacher()

  • Danny Lemieux

    Hi E.S.,

    I hear you. My mother, brother and I are Reagan Conservatives. My father is a hard core secular socialist. Love him dearly, but we just don’t talk politics. It makes us all more civilized and focused on what is truly important – family! Merry Christmas.

  • zhombre

    I am far from being a Christian Conservative (am too frankly pagan), and could only claim to be a Reagan Conservative retroactively, which would be a form of hypocrisy as I never voted for RR and only repudiated liberal views much later; but I have to agree with ExPreacherman in that I don’t care Huckabee is a Christian and is motivated by his faith; it is judgment and temperament I do not trust (same with McCain, who is worthy of admiration for his war record and is rock solid on defense and security issues, even if McCain-Feingold remains a travesty). I have no inclination to vote for another faux Southern populist, another Arkansas governor from Hope (is there an Arkansas town called False Front?), another Baptist bigmouth like Jimmy Carter. Huckabee speaks well, but so did Carter, so does Clinton, so does a jury-swaying lawyer like Edwards; but I can help but be suspicious of what crusading, self-regarding small-curd consciousness lies behind the words.

  • jj

    Add to the above, you also have to wonder about the atitude – I mean, what kind of jackass thinks he’s going to get away with this kind of history while calling himself a Republican?

    The MSM completely forgetting about it, moving on, anbd blaming somebody else, well: that only works for Democrats, Mike! How big a dope do you have to be to forget that?