Two views of Giuliani

Dennis Prager lauds Giuliani (and I think he’s right) and the Times attacks Giuliani (they’re their usual “he’s a meanie” attack). I like Giuliani and always have. I prefer the political positions Romney has taken, which is why I’ve endorsed him, but I would very, very happily cast my vote for Giuliani. I’d be delighted if his big gamble pays off and he pays no price for having ignored Iowa and New Hampshire. Considering how unstable the frontrunner field is going into Florida, maybe he did do the right thing — or, at least, maybe he didn’t do the horribly wrong thing.

UPDATE:  Thanks, BHG.  I’m good at grammar — and really bad at proofreading.

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  • http://baldheadedgeek.blogspot.com Bald-Headed Geek

    I know how big you are on grammar, Bookworm, so don’t you mean “their usual “he’s meanie” attack”?

    ;-)

    BHG

  • http://baldheadedgeek.blogspot.com Bald-Headed Geek

    On a serious note, I’m losing faith in the entire Republican field (and I have never had any faith in the Dems). I was and am a “Rudy” guy, but worry that his campaign strategy of ignoring the early primaries has allowed to fall completely off the majority of radar screens in this country. Romney just hasn’t captured my imagination, and much as I respect and admire John McCain, he lost me the day James “F– the Jews” Baker was mentioned in association with his campaign. You can’t claim to be a supporter of Israel and have anything to do with Baker.

    BHG

  • Ellie

    There’s no doubt that Rudy is Israel’s most reliable supporter in the race. So, if you live in Fla, vote for Rudy and ignore what you hear in the polls.

    They are not reflecting the “undecideds” — the biggest voing block in Fla — and of those who have a pick, most admit they could still change their mind.

    If you need an injection of faith go here to read the Giuliani Campaign’s Press Releases:

    http://www.joinrudy2008.com/article/tag/26

  • Al

    HI B-H Geek,
    Glad you’re on Rudy’s team. I agree it is very dismaying that Rudy’s absence in the early primaries has caused many to discount him when once they did count him. But there is one aspect of this which I honestly don’t think even Rudy considered. ( If he did, then he is not only very lucky, thus acquiring Napoleon’s endorsement, but also verrrry smart)
    The New Hampshire and South Carolina primaries were open. Dems and independents could, and did, vote for McCain in an alledgedly Republican primary. It was the Dems from Massachusetts and Vermont which put McCain in front, and the same stripe “Independents” in South Carolina doing the same. If Rudy had spent his treasure in these contests, if he had contested McCain, he probably would not have won. And McCain would have.Thanks to the ballot box stuffing tactic of the Libs. Thereby demonstrating to the uninitiated that McCain had a better chance than Rudy.
    But Rudy kept his powder dry. He is pouring it into the canons of Florida. Florida is a closed primary state. Independents and Dems cannot vote on the Republican side. This will be the first primary which will give an accurate take on the perception of Republicans. And if he wins in Florida, super Tuesday is 7 days away. It’ enough to make one think of the tightest horse race in history. Which is what it is. Leaves you breathless.
    Keep the faith.
    Al

  • http://thomaschronicles.com Thomas

    Hello Bookworm,

    If Guiliani gets the nomination, I’ll probably support him but not enthusiastically. Guiliani oscillates between open borders and not open borders. I trust him to be tough with the terrorists, but I don’t know if he will send us up the river with the globalists and thereby, de facto, lose our sovereignty. He’s a heck of a lot better than the Dems, I think, but like Bald-headed Geek, I’m disillusioned with the entire Republican Party.

    I’m currently leaning Romney because he’s the only one out of the entire field of candidates, Democratic AND Republican, who talks of maintaining American sovereignty and the preservation of the Union. All the other candidates leanings toward globalism to one degree or another.

    (BTW, Bald-Headed Geek, James Baker was also one of the ones who said that the good thing coming out of our war in Iraq is that no future president can wage a unilateral war. Future American Presidents have to ask the UN for permission now. Who would dare after what they did to Bush? I’ll tell you, we might look back on Iraq and Afghanistan as the last national war before the onset of a global world government.)

    As I said before, the Republican Party has fragmented through all this palaver of “litmus tests” and debates over who’s “the true conservatives” after the 2006 Congressional election. The Republicans just don’t get it. They lost the 2006 congressional election because their hand got caught in the till and because of their blanket disregard of their constituents.

    It’s pretty devastating when a political party presents itself as the party of competence for six years and then bungle Hurricane Katrina. Sure, LA’s governor and Ray Nagin should have gotten plenty of blame, but it was within the government’s power to override them. Then there was the immigration debacle. Then there was all the scandals (real or unreal).

    The fact that President Bush refused to talk to his base, and refused to talk to his party for that matter, didn’t help matters much. The Republican leadership didn’t have anyone to articulate their position, and when a position was articulated it became a cacophony of contradictory positions.

    The President wanted one thing, John McCain wanted the opposite, other Senators want to support the President but wanted other things, and the Republican base scratched their heads. The extremely odd thing about all this is that the base and a whole lot of independents wanted to support the Republicans for fear of the alternative, the Democrats.

    The Republicans should be sailing through this election with a walk, but instead you have a party in imploding mode, and there’s no earthly reason why it should be. What I would like to see is John McCain drop out since I consider him too old and unfit for the office, and I’d like to see Romney and Guiliani move forward into the debating limelight. I’m completely excluding Huckabee in this because he is pretty much a Leftist with right wing bigotries (He stood by his position to toss homosexuals into camps for “sanitary” reasons. This is an unconscionable position for any politician.)

    Huckabee is a member of Lefty Council on Foreign Relations and Trilateral Commission. What’s more I don’t trust him because of the fact that he’s Arkansas governor right after Bill Clinton, he’s from the same town as Bill Clinton, he went to the same high school as Bill Clinton, and he campaigns similar to Bill Clinton. I sound like a conspiracy theorist on Huckabee, but I really don’t like all these connections.

    I think Guiliani and Romney would shine if it was mostly them two in the debates. They have two different directions they want to take America and I have a feeling they’ll be more Presidential. It is hard being presidential when you have five people on stage all champing at the bit and interrupting everything.

    … and for goodness sake, keep Ron Paul off the debates.

  • Al

    Oh, I’m sorry. I did not mention why the Dems would want McCain to be the Republican candidate for POTUS.
    It is because the Libs ( the Main Sewer Media, Teddy Kenedy, Al Sharpton, George Soros, Bill Clinton, and the Iranian speed boats) could blow that sailor out of the water. This is a strategy which they tried in 2000, and the Republicans, and the nation, didn’t bite. But it was a close thing. Now, it’s even closer.
    Al

  • Mike Devx

    I can find reasons to support each of the Republican candidates. I still mostly favor Giuliani for this reason:

    My dislike for liberals is because they take things that are good, things that work, and turn them into cesspools. Rudy took the cesspool that was New York City, ruined by liberals, and turned it back into something good, something that worked.

    He may have liberal tendencies, but that’s a conservative approach to governing that worked.

  • Zhombre

    I’ll concur with Mike. As one who visited NYC pre and post Giuliani I’ll testify it was like the difference between Potterville and Bedford Falls in the old Jimmy Stewart movie. Giuliani like Romney has a record of actually governing something. And I’d point out too that Giuliani is the only Republican running who actually worked in the Reagan Administration.

  • Gringo

    For those interested, the book Freakonomics has a different take on cleaning up crime in NYC in the 1990s and other places. That is, it wasn’t Rudy’s admininstration, but other demographic trends, that were the cause of the crime drop in NYC.

    Even having read the book, I view Giuliani’s approach has having been helpful in turning NYC around. As such, his track record as a competent administrator leans me towards Rudy.

    Anyone from NYC who does not turn into a moonbat liberal has an independent streak. His turning down the Saudi millions because the Saudi Prince included a put-down of Israel in the gift also indicates some guts.
    Yes, I would be quite content to dimple a chad for Rudy.

  • Zhombre

    Some politicians, in the same circumstances, would have taken that demographic trend and turned it to crap.

  • Danny Lemieux

    Sorry folks – I won’t be taking my marbles home with me.

    I will vote enthusiastically for whomever gets the Republican nomination. Staying out of this race is just as bad as voting for the radical socialist and her husband in the other party. I already accept that any of the candidates will get me only half a loaf – but that is still better than no loaf at all.

    For any of you that have any questions about what that would entail, I highly recommend Jonah Goldberg’s “Liberal Fascism” – we’ve been there before, we don’t want to be there again. They will do huge damage to America and the world at large. We conservatives are supposed to be good about thinking through the consequences of our actions.

  • Lulu

    Z,
    You are right. NYC transformed utterly under Rudy, and I love your analogy- from grafitti covered subway cars to cars made of a material where spraypaint just wouldn’t stick, to safer streets, and one lock instead of 20 on each door. He also broke the mob. I’ve liked Rudy since the beginning and I wish him luck,
    I think he is the one the Dems are most afraid of- that’s why the media has been relentless in attacking him, or ignoring him out of existence.

  • Gringo

    Z:
    Some politicians, in the same circumstances, would have taken that demographic trend and turned it to crap.

    Agreed.

  • http://ymarsakar.wordpress.com/ ymarsakar

    Democrats think Rudy didn’t clean up New York, that he just logged some cases against OrgCrime to stock up his prosecutorial folder. As for New York, their response was “Have you ever been to New York?” They don’t think it has been cleaned up, not by a Republican.

  • http://ymarsakar.wordpress.com/ ymarsakar

    (they’re their usual “he’s a meanie” attack).

    Your other option was “they’re doing their usual “he is a meanie” attack”.

  • Al

    Danny is absolutely correct. If we don’t voter for the Republican, and all the other Republicans on down the ticket, and B or She gets in, we are accomplices in the crime.
    Al

  • Trish Oslen

    LuLu on Rudy:

    “I think he is the one the Dems are most afraid of — that’s why the media has been relentless in attacking him, or ignoring him out of existence.”

    You are an insightful woman!; I couldn’t agree more!

    btw, I think Rudy is on Larry King this eveing.

  • Mike Devx

    Looks like Giuliani is fading in Florida (at least according to the polls). So my personal favorite will be dropping out soon.

    That will leave me Romney, McCain, and Huckabee to consider. Each of them have strengths and flaws, but I’m sure I will end up supporting whichever one of them wins the nomination.

    Romney has been a successful executive in many venues, so I guess my support would go to him. I recognize this puts me in the ‘competence’ group of voters rather than the group that votes based on conservative principles. I do worry whether Romney has the spine, and the conservative principled fortitude, to stand up to Washington and to the Democrats, when the pressure is on. I’ve heard the ol’ ‘Lets’ Clean Up Washington’ argument many times before and it’s never worked…

  • Ellie

    (CNN) — If Hillary Clinton and John McCain become their party’s presidential nominees, the general election race is likely to be a love-fest.

  • Ellie

    If Hill loves Mac so much, what is wrong with this picture??? Maybe her dream opponent?

  • Zhombre

    Don’t be so sure. Bill & Hill’s concept of a love-fest is requires them being the centerpiece.

  • Ellie

    PS:I am still voting for Rudy on 2/5 no matter what. That’s what a Primary means. Looking/hoping for a 3rd Party run in Nov.