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  1. Ozzie says

    I’ll give it one more try. What the founding fathers did not want was the Methodist or Presbyterian or Lutheran version of Christianity as a national religion. It was not a choice between Christian, Muslim or Buddhist.- Brian

    They didn’t want ANY religion, including Chrisitianity to be the “national religion.”

    They wanted a Separation of Church and State, regardless what the dominant religion might be. The First Admendment protects minorities from the majority, and, given the bigtory against minority religions, I’d say it’s a damn fine thing to have (and should be protected forever and ever).

    Today’s Wall Street Journal featued an article, and pointed to a ploy people resort to when trying to make the erroneous case that the U.S is a Christian Nation, namely, plucking “Founding Fathers quotes way out of context to misleadingly imply they were devout Christians. In many other cases, this same technique has been used to promote the argument that America was created to be a Christian nation, and separation of church and state is a myth. . . ”

    Hmmmm…..Would someone actually do such a thing?

    Here’s the quote in context:

    Insensitivity to Religious Minorities: There’s been much attention to Gov. Palin having sat in the audience during a sermon from the head of Jews for Jesus, an organization most Jews find offensive. Honestly, a lot of the reason folks became so exercised with this is as kharmic retribution for the right holding Sen. Obama accountable for the sermons of Jeremiah Wright. I doubt this Jews for Jesus sermon would have gotten any attention without the Wright precedent. Until we know whether Gov. Palin herself actually agreed with this, then this sermon should be no more held against Gov. Palin than Mr. Wright was against Sen. Obama — and actually less so since it was a one-shot guest sermon.

    What should be of concern to religious minorities is that Palin signed a resolution establishing a Christian Heritage Week. It didn’t actually declare the U.S. to be an officially Christian nation but it plucked Founding Fathers quotes way out of context to misleadingly imply they were devout Christians. In many other cases, this same technique has been used to promote the argument that America was created to be a Christian nation, and separation of church and state is a myth. Now, I’m willing to drop this from the list if can be shown that also has a Jewish Heritage and Muslim Heritage and Secular Heritage Week (I’m not holding my breath). That would mean she wasn’t giving preference to one religion over another.”

  2. BrianE says

    Ozzie said:

    Today’s Wall Street Journal featued an article, and pointed to a ploy people resort to when trying to make the erroneous case that the U.S is a Christian Nation, namely, plucking “Founding Fathers quotes way out of context to misleadingly imply they were devout Christians. In many other cases, this same technique has been used to promote the argument that America was created to be a Christian nation, and separation of church and state is a myth. . . ”

    Religious Affiliation # of delegates % of delegates
    Episcopalian/Anglican 31 56.4%
    Presbyterian 16 29.1%
    Congregationalist 8 14.5%
    Quaker 3 5.5%
    Catholic 2 3.6%
    Methodist 2 3.6%
    Lutheran 2 3.6%
    Dutch Reformed 2 3.6%
    TOTAL 55 100%

    In terms of religious affiliation, the men mirrored the overwhelmingly Protestant character of American religious life at the time and were members of various denominations. Only two, Carroll and Fitzsimons, were Roman Catholics. One was a Deist.

    I haven’t taken any quote out of context, merely pointed out that the issue confronting the framers of the constitution, to not favor one denomination over another.
    We all know that “the separation of church and state” isn’t in the Bill of Rights.

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