Unofficial poll about Romney’s electibility

I know that, in the run-up to the to the 2008 presidential election, many Christians said that they could not vote for Romney because he is a Mormon.  I’m wondering if that’s changed.  Romney may be a Mormon but Obama is, well, Obama.  For true Christians, can there be a “lesser of two evils” calculus when it comes to the presidency?

If he is the most likely candidate to beat Obama in 2012, Christians will vote for Mitt Romney.

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Comments are welcome, but no Mormon bashing, please.

(My views on Romney are here.)

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  • suek

    Just as an addendum, here’s a really neat page on some of the aspects of the economy.

    http://money.cnn.com/news/storysupplement/economy/gapmap/index.htm

    I didn’t vote, by the way. The framing of the question is very awkward. I don’t know if “Christians” will vote for him. I have no idea.

    I think the question is whether his religion is enough of a factor for “Christians” to either vote against him or abstain from voting. So…if “Christians” are against him, is he still the “most likely to defeat Obama”? The question should be “if Romney wins the GOP primary, and Obama is the Dem candidate….will Evangelicals vote for him or stay home?”

    I’m still not sure. I don’t feel the same animus because of his religion – I have a problem with his actions as governor of Massachusetts. His health plan is destroying their economy. You can say – as he does – that the legislature was going to pass one anyway, and he just tried to minimize the damage, but that was the Bush attitude as well. I don’t want that again. Veto the darn thing, and if the legislature (or Congress) overrides it, then so be it. It’s their baby. Take a stand!

  • Deana

    I have a dear friend who is Mormon. He is one of the most honest, hard-working, honorable, and faithful people I have ever met. I would trust him and his family to care for someone I loved without a second thought.

    And yet, I find Mormonism troubling and not just from a theological standpoint. People of all religions believe things that are otherwise mysterious – I have nothing against faith. But the more I learn about Mormonism, the scarier it is. I would not use the word “cult” to describe Mormonism but at times, there are parallels.

    I do admire Romney’s business experience and do not doubt his love of America and his willingness to defend it. He would undoubtedly be a massive improvement from Obama.

  • BrianE

    Whoops,
    Somehow I drug up an old post.
    Living in an area with a high Mormon population, and having friends who are both Mormon and ex-Mormon, I would vote for him if he were the candidate, but as Suek has pointed out, there are other reasons to be skeptical about him.

  • Oldflyer

    Of course I would vote for him. I voted for him last time.

    I interpreted your poll as would “you” vote for him as that is the only question I could answer..

    I know the Mormon Church has a checkered past. I hope I am not revealing any secrets if I say that the Catholic Church also has a checkered past. I was raised a Southern Baptist; many people are skeptical of us. If a religion does not advocate the overthrow of the United States; persecution of a segment of the population, or the establishment of a Theocracy, I am going to look beyond that factor and assess the person on individual merits.

    I would echo some others here about Mormons. I am fortunate to know several Mormons; people I have served with, my current dentist, my most recent surgeon, among them. I invariably have found Mormons to be people of high character and devoted to the country and community. Many are also fun to be with.

  • Mike Devx

    How is his health insurance experiment in Massachusetts working out?

    I haven’t heard much about it recently, but the experiment seemed to be failing, the last I heard.

  • http://bookwormroom.com Bookworm

    I think you’re right about the health insurance. Of course, he should have learned his lesson by now.