These are the times when I really like John McCain

Al Franken, the rude buffoon from Minnesota deserved to be taken to task, and John McCain did it.

The set-up:  Joe Lieberman ran out of time to finish his talk; he asked, as Senators do, for a couple of extra minutes; and Al Franken, who was chairing, refused, something Senators have never done:

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  1. says

    The reason why I don’t like McCain can be summed up in his own words, “I don’t know what has happened here in this body”.
     
     
    Being in the Senate for 25 years and he still doesn’t know what the hell has happened in his playing ground? His grasp of what is going on with the rest of America will be lower even than that.
    The principle is true, but McCain won’t use it to topple the corrupt power politics. He has been given the chance, and failed. He does not see that simply upholding the traditions of rules in the Senate is not going to defeat the rising tide of power in the service of darkness.
     
     

  2. suek says

    I’d have liked him even better if he had simply said – “I yield 5 of my minutes to the Senator of Connecticut” and let the “I don’t know what’s happening” thing alone.  He knows – and so do all the others…

  3. pst314 says

    I took the “I don’t know what has happened here in this body” not as a confession of bewilderment but as a rhetorical expression of criticism, much like a parent might say “Stop hitting your sister! I just don’t know what’s wrong with you, little Al, you’ve been acting like a bully ever since Bobby was elected hall monitor.”

  4. BrianE says

    That kind of dissing is usually reserved for the minority party.

    Hmmm. Maybe they’re giving Lieberman a not so subtle hint. He’s my favorite liberal, but I shudder to think he caucuses with the Republicans. He’s still a big government liberal. He’s an independent and needs to stay one.

    He’s made an overture that he might come over to the Repubs if he can keep his senority– why do we think he wouldn’t be as big a pain in the Repub side as he has been to the Dems.

  5. Mike Devx says

    VERY WEAK.
     
    McCain has been in the Senate for more than two decades, and he’s just seen something he’d never seen before, in a violation of the unwritten rules of Senate comity.  He could have launched into quite an effective speech, if he’d been capable.  But he is INCAPABLE of that speech.  (Whereas Daniel Hannan, and one might think, Sarah Palin, are not incapable.)
     
    This is a perfect example of why we must avoid electing McCains in 2010.  Or any other lite Republican.  You’ve got to elect the ones that CARE, that understand their philosophy, and can make a speech around it.  PLEASE.  In the Republican primaries that are looming, look for the articulate conservative who knows how to fight, and knows how to deliver a speech, and knows how to make his points in front of a camera.  PLEASE.
     
     

  6. says

    It’s true that McCain is anything but articulate, and he sounds like a weenie, not a warrior.  On the other hand, he actually stood up and said something to Franken’s face.  No one else in that body did so.

  7. says

    McCain is also strategically unnecessary in the broader view, since anyone that simply gives what Petraeus and McChrystal needs, will win the foreign war front. But only the politician can take care of the political front and McCain has for some odd decades demonstrated that he is still on the old template of “let’s all just get along to go along” which has been the cause of so many anti-American sabotages and erosions of liberty and self-respect in this nation.
     
    There is no military leader or military background McCain can call upon to fix the political issues and the misplaced set of priorities McCain himself has. Surge or no surge, support for the war or lack of support, doesn’t come into it. It won’t help him fight the political front and eradicate the evil at the heart of America.
     
    I would sooner trust his wife as President than he himself, for I have more trust in her judgment than his.

  8. Mike Devx says

    The problem for me is, if the Republicans regain the Senate or the House, whether in 2010 or 2012, I haven’t seen anything that would tell me that they’ve learned any lessons from 2008.  It will be back to the same old, same old crap that turned off the American people in the first place.
     
    They haven’t put out any kind of coherent message yet.  The American people seem on the whole to sense this as well.  The negative-positive split for Republicans – in some polls – is still worse than the Dems.
     
    What good is power, if all you use it for is a status quo that perpetuates corruption, malfeasance, and allows those people in control to stay asleep at the wheel (when they’re not busy being corrupt, that is).  There’s no conservative philosophy guiding their actions; the only philosophy they rely on is getting re-elected.  For what purpose?
     
    McCain’s good on military foreign policy, but he was one of the Republicans who publicly bought in big time into global warming and illegals amnesty.  And a number of other Republican-lite positions.  Pandering?  Or a lack of a coherent philosophy?  I suppose he’s good on some other things, but I just can’t trust him.  And he’s proven he can’t inspire.  From what I can tell, he’s even in trouble for re-election.
     
    But yes, it was good of him to try to take Franken down a notch or two.
     
     

  9. SADIE says

    This is the result when a not funny comedian from SNL transitions from programmed TV to politics – they still believe their own hype.
    It was a twist on the Chevy Chase tagline…I am Chevy Chase and you’re not – AF tweaked it to:   I am in charge and you’re not. What a putz!

  10. Danny Lemieux says

    Ymarsaker says “McCain has for some odd decades demonstrated that he is still on the old template of “let’s all just get along to go along””
    Because that is how the Senate operates. Its trademark is forced comity and compromise to get things done , which is almost always half a loaf or less.
    This is why Senators should never run for and be elected to the Presidency. The Presidency is an executive post that demands leadership which, in turn, demands a willingness to stand fast to one’s positions and an ability to carry others along in a grand and shared vision of victory. Our failure to recognize this is in large part why we have such moral and mental gerbils populating our government today.
     

  11. BrianE says

    This is why Senators should never run for and be elected to the Presidency. The Presidency is an executive post that demands leadership which, in turn, demands a willingness to stand fast to one’s positions and an ability to carry others along in a grand and shared vision of victory. Our failure to recognize this is in large part why we have such moral and mental gerbils populating our government today.

    Good point.

    I think LBJ was the exception to this, possibly because he knew where all the skeletons were.

  12. BrianE says

    I didn’t say I agreed with the politics or the policies of LBJ, but we are still living with suffering from some of his policies.

    We were warned prior to this election about the lack of administrative experience of the elitist political class (aka senators).

    They’ve never actually run anything larger than a senate staff for the most part, with a seemingly limitless personal of official budget (think the millions of dollars they take with them when they leave the senate in the form of unspent campaign contributions. Like the inheritance tax, they should forfeit that money when the retire)

    We’re certainly seeing that in the current occupant of the WH. A year into his adminstration, many key appointments are still vacant.

  13. Ruth H says

    I watched this on c-span and I’m pretty sure he was reading from a script someone wrote for him in case this came up. Notice he stumbles and looks down before he finishes.

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