Comments

  1. suek says

    Eric Cantor tickles my funny bone…he looks _so_ Jewish, and then has that slightly southern accent.  It’s the unexpected thing.  At our school umpteen years ago, we had a black African priest who came to speak to us.  So no big deal…introductions etc, just as with any guest speaker.  Then he opened his mouth and spoke with the _strongest_ Irish brogue!    Maybe it’s just me, but those little unexpected inconsistencies provide me with small moments of hilarity!
    Of course, then you get to humor discussions.  And stereotypes.  And why funny is funny – and a lot of it has to do with stereotypes, and when the stereotype is smashed, it’s funny.  Eliminate stereotypes with your political correctness and you eliminate a lot of very funny stuff.  We all lose.

  2. Danny Lemieux says

    Suek, it may surprise you that the South has a long history of Jewish settlement, right from the days of our founding. I seem to recall that Charleston, SC had a very established Jewish community…there were Jews who served in the Confederate Army.
     
    Way up here in the North, there are records of small Jewish communities at the time of the Jesuits. I suspect they spoke with French Canadian accents.

  3. Danny Lemieux says

    Suek, it may surprise you that the South has a long history of Jewish settlement, right from the days of our founding. I seem to recall that Charleston, SC had a very established Jewish community…there were Jews who served in the Confederate Army.
    Way up here in the North, there are records of small Jewish communities at the time of the Jesuits. I suspect they spoke with French Canadian accents.

  4. suek says

    >>it may surprise you that the South has a long history of Jewish settlement, right from the days of our founding.>>
     
    It _does_ surprise me some – not that I thought it _wasn’t_ true – just never particularly thought about it.  My family is from the northeast…Massachusetts, specifically.  My mother’s closest friend from college days was Jewish, and they remained friends throughout their lives.  There was a short period when we and they (she married and had two daughters) both lived in Montclair, New Jersey, and they included us in some of their social occasions, which were primarily Jewish centered.  Going back to that childish perceptions article Book posted, my exposure to Jews has simply been connected to a “New Yawk” accent.  It’s a mental thing.  Has nothing to do with reality.  I suspect I’m not alone, though…it’s just that stereotype thing.
     
    Does anyone know of a “History of Jews in America” book?

  5. says

    Suek:

    I know exactly what you mean.  Growing up in SF, I knew a gazillion Chinese people.  They spoke two ways:  with a Chinese accent or with an American accent.  I was therefore very taken aback to meet a Chinese man with a broad Yorkshire accent.  I knew Yorkshire men — i.e., Caucasians — spoke that way, but it just startled my preconceived notions to have an Asian man do the same.

    Of course, now that Yorkshire has turned Pakistani, I do wonder what accent dominates the region.

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