Sunday mish-mash (plus Books and an Open Thread)

Although my regular stat counter is still refusing to speak to me, another stat counter has indicated that my numbers have plummeted, going from the thousands to the hundreds overnight.  (I feel just like the stock market.)

Since I’m not going to panic and assume that everyone has suddenly abandoned me en masse, I’m wondering if any of you have had any difficulty getting to my blog.  If so, please let me know, and I’ll pass the word on to my wonderful blog master.

I’m still working on the trial, which is kind of interesting.  The last time I headed trial preparation, my client did not have a sophisticated scanning system.  This client, however, does.  Every document is already a pdf in the system (or, if not, it’s easily added).  Because the case relies heavily on photographs, I’ve also set up Picasa, so that we can easily review the hundreds of images and decide which best support our case.  Then, the photos go on a disk, Kinko’s prints them up (which is cheaper than using your own ink), and you’re off to the races.

I’ve also prepared a chart identifying each document (which is necessary anyway for the mandatory exchange of trial exhibit info with the opposing party).  In the chart I have a column that doesn’t go to opposing counsel.  That column has hyperlinks to each document’s location on the server.  Essentially, I’m preparing all the documents for trial without touching a single piece of paper.  It’s time consuming, but kind of fascinating, and it means that we never lose a document.  Woo-hoo!

Still, interesting or not, the whole thing is time-consuming, and that doesn’t even count the trial brief and pre-trial motions, all of which I’m working on today.  Then, off to the symphony.

You can see where this is going, right?  Not a lot of blogging.  It’s another Open Thread day — and a “what are you reading” day.  As for me, when I’m not being a legal eagle, I’m reading 101 Things You Didn’t Know About Irish History: The People, Places, Culture, and Tradition of the Emerald Isle.  It’s not deep, but it’s easy, fun and interesting.

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Comments

  1. Gringo says

    I have been involved in delivering documents for civil trials. It isn’t fun, especially when you consider I have not been paid for it. Takes a lot of time. At times it can be satisfying. During my short time on the witness stand I presented photos which showed the wealthy plaintiff had not been accurate in his statements when he was on the witness stand. Nail, meet coffin.
     
    Most of the documents were electronic, but I also scanned in some hard copies, which made me rue not having purchased a more up to date scanner. Absent the trials, I use a scanner about ten times a year.
     
    One definition of an incompetent attorney: one who doesn’t request discovery documents.
     

  2. says

    I’m trying to branch out and read different kinds of Japanese manga.
     
    It’s in black and white and given the character themes, reminds me strangely of American westerns and movies like High Noon 1952.
     
    I read the latest Ring of Fire series from Eric Flint. It’s much more entertaining than his collaborations on his world setting in previous offerings.
     
    I’m awaiting with baited breath David Weber’s series to A Mighty Fortress and Brandon Sanderson’s sequel to Way of Kings.
     
     

  3. Michael Adams says

    Today’s Old Testament lectionary was from the twelfth chapter of Genesis, including verses two and three, to Abram, “Who blesses you, I will bless, who curses you I will curse.” I dropped my bulletin, and, in picking it up at that point, I got a pretty good look around the church, a hundred people or so, half of them mouthing the words as they were read, the other half nodding seriously. It’s probably the most important reading I did today.

  4. Spartacus says

    I’m getting much better, but have always had trouble saying, “This [book / booklet / magazine / notebook / document / scratch pad] contains interesting and important ideas which I have not yet fully explored and appreciated, but honestly, it’s just not going to happen in this lifetime.  Maybe in the next (and more eternal) one if, God willing, the paper doesn’t combust from the ambient room temperature when I pick it up to read.  Now, where’s that recycling bin?”
     
    Six years ago, having been on the work-politics-sleep-work-politics-sleep treadmill for entirely too long, without time for other projects (like tidying), the floor of my home office was covered by stacks and stacks of ideas, each about 15″ high, to the point that the only way from the doorway to my desk was by literally leaping to one of two little bare spots of carpet, and then to the other, and then to my desk.  Any sort of foot injury during that time would have prevented me from using my computer.
     
    Then I got a scanner.  Somewhere between 30,000 – 40,000 scans later, a world of ideas, records and memories sits on a portable hard drive (with CD backups), and I have the amazing power to vacuum at will.  Life is good.  I like scanners.

  5. SADIE says

    Spartacus
     
    I just cut and pasted your post, while still drinking my first cup of morning coffee and sent it to a friend of mine.
     
    Too bad the same system cannot be applied to hoarders of cats, clothing and other clutter.

  6. Spartacus says

    Sadie — Actually, I *did* have seven cats.  It was a bit of a trick holding each one down on the flatbed scanner while simultaneously reaching over to the keyboard to start the scan, but I figured that trying to put them through the document feeder, the thing would just become hopelessly jammed.

  7. Spartacus says

    Sadiee — Although I do enjoy setting up so that some other clever person can spike it over the net, you give me far too much credit — it was really just a little top-o’-the-morning animal cruelty humor.  (“Rrowr!”)
     
    And one fine day, I do hope to learn what it is that you put in that coffee of yours.  ;)

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