San Francisco discovers free enterprise

San Francisco is definitely up in the top five when it comes to “most Progressively governed cities in America.”  No surprise, then, that the city’s finances are in a shambles.  What is a surprise is the fact that, faced with a looming budget collapse, the City has suddenly discovered capitalist incentives:  it’s offering the big employers tax cuts to stay in the City.

This is a smart move on San Francisco’s part.  (And I can’t believe I wrote that sentence about the City that doesn’t know how.)  The Leftists may call them “the rich people” or “blood sucking corporations,” but I have another name for them:  employers.  The City has discovered that if you constantly penalize employers, they go away.

As Obama’s vicious, dishonest budget speech shows, he hasn’t yet come to that little realization.  Nor, despite his intellectual common ground with Tom Friedman, has he seemed to realize that Friedman is right about one thing:  the earth is indeed flat.  In the old days, employers had nowhere to run to and nowhere to hide.  Now, the corporations can go to all the other socialist countries that have lower corporate tax rates than the U.S., while individuals simply bid a fond adieu to their natal land.

I realized today that what makes Obama’s class warfare even more disgusting is that he makes no attempt to pretend that he’s one of the little people.  As I read in Ronald Kessler’s In the President’s Secret Service: Behind the Scenes with Agents in the Line of Fire and the Presidents They Protect, when Jimmy Carter, the last president who presided over such a disastrous economy, paraded around carrying his own suitcase, it was pure theater:  the suitcase was empty.  Nevertheless, he made the effort.

Obama, however, doesn’t bother.  Even as he demagogues about the fat cats, stopping just short of demanding their heads on pikes, he openly revels in the kind of lifestyle only the very rich can afford.  While he lectures us about heat and air-c0nditioning, he keeps his White House digs at 75 all year round; while he tells us to trade in our tried and true cars for expensive hybrids, he and his family jet all over the world on exotic vacations, traveling in gas guzzlers everywhere they go; while he “commiserates” with our belt tightening, he and his family dine on lobster, Kobe beef, and foie gras.  His arrogance is so overweening that he assumes that he is entitled to these luxuries — at our expense, of course — even as he insists that we cut back, tone done, retrench and, of course, destroy our employer class.

Putz isn’t a strong enough word, but it’s the only one I’ll use on my PG blog.

Cross-posted at Right Wing News

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  • Moose

    Y: “Eighty-five percent of San Francisco’s businesses have fewer than ten employees, and the city is a hub of entrepreneurial activity”

    So, that pust SF where in relation to the national average for size of businesses with fewer than ten employees? How does Plano, TX compare to that statistic? Does that fact provide licens to make a subjective statement, or can that statement be used, really, for any metropolitan area?

    Not sure, but I think Detroit may have the same percenatge of businesses with fewer than 10 employees. I guess that city is the hub of entrepreneurial activity as well.

  • Moose

    Sorry, quote should be atrritubted to The Z-Man/Group

  • Duchess of Austin

    Can somebody tell me please…I’m a bit confused…..is Zach an individual using the “royal” we, or a committee of intellectuals posting as a collective?  I can relate to feeling like I’m reading a script for an episode of Star Trek, TNG.
     
    Either way, he/she/they(?) is/are getting a verbal asswhoopin’ from the amazing posters here.  Most of the time I just lurk, trying to learn something.  I’m loving this thread.  Great work to Charles and Danny.  Where were teachers like you when I was in school?
     
    Fight on, guys….ya’ll rock!
     

  • http://zachriel.blogspot.com/2005/07/liberal-v-conservative.html Zachriel

    Moose: So, that pust SF where in relation to the national average for size of businesses with fewer than ten employees? 

    For fewer than 100 employees, the national average is 24.57 businesses per 1000 people. In San Francisco, it is 27.65, or about 12% more than the average. 

  • Moose

    Z: “For fewer than 100 employees, the national average is 24.57 businesses per 1000 people. In San Francisco, it is 27.65, or about 12% more than the average.”

    OK. What does this new statistic have to do with less than businesses with less than 10 ee’s? This is a strange dance your performing. Where should we go next? I got it, let’s see how many businesses are have between 43 and 63 ee’s. 

    Your newly grabbed stat has nothing to do with any point you’re trying to make.  

    Here’s one for your books: For-Hire Truck Tonnage Index decresaed 2.9% in February.

  • Charles Martel

    Duchess, thanks for a great compliment. I think Zack comes here because he knows he has finally reached a place where his leftist nonsense gets called. When you’ve been telling yourself how superior you are but retain a shred of doubt, it’s good to go to where you can get a mental overhaul from folks who are much better at these things than you are.

    Since Zack is a game player, it could be that he is using this site as a teaching tool for his fellow basementeers: Here’s how to incite by saying silly things and stealing other peoples’ ideas. Of course the unwanted part of the lesson is when his observers note that he does routinely get his clocked cleaned.

    (A note about the number of S.F. businesses with fewer than 100 employees: Once again, Zack does not bother to think about why S.F. seems to be such a hot bed of small businesses. One reason is that the city’s immense congestion and restrictive zoning practices force the creation of hundreds of mom-and-pop grocery stores. They’re overpriced as hell, but convenient in terms of saving shoppers a hellish trip in heavy traffic to destinations where there are few parking spaces. Duh! Also, many small businesses are boutiques that cater to the carriage trade, such as shoe stores, manicurists, and dry cleaners—hardly entrepreneurial. Also not cheap. The entrepreneurial shops that Zack cites, such as Twitter, keep a corporate presence in San Francisco for reasons of prestige and ready access to the city’s lawyers and bankers. But they conduct most of their business offsite, beyond city boundaries in order to avoid excessive taxation and workplace regulation. Thus, S.F.’s sudden realization that its business climate for people who are not wealthy Democrats sucks.) 

  • http://ymarsakar.wordpress.com Ymarsakar

    God forbid that I’d be mistaken for Z.

  • Moose

    My deepest apologies, Y.

  • http://ymarsakar.wordpress.com Ymarsakar

    Is it easy for me to start business X or Y there because there are wealthy people there?

    In a limited sense, some luxury businesses would find it useful to know where their market demographics are. People selling yachts and fine cuisine would be better placed to do business in certain parts of SF, due to the demographics. And that is what surveys such as Mercer accomplishes. It provides certain data to businesses and factions who desire such data.

    This distinction, of course, has not been made by Z purely because he is unaware of it. The nuance, the details, the transfigurations of human motivations and behavior, all are a mystery to Z the messenger.

    I often describe Z in this fashion. A person that cannot speak for Mercer or Bush or even himself, since he keeps saying “we”. Well, why should I believe he has the “authority” to speak for all his other selves? When Z talks about his point or lack of it, Z can’t even speak for himself, yet he believes he can speak for Mercer… ridiculous.

    For fewer than 100 employees, the national average is 24.57 businesses per 1000 people. In San Francisco, it is 27.65, or about 12% more than the average.

    I’m pretty sure businesses have great concentrations in population centers and not in the rural areas of America, which actually constitute most of the square area of the US. As real climatologists in Danny’s video said, averaging things out makes a mishmash out of any valuable information contained in empirical data. The true worth of such data is to look at local variances as they pertain to the local conditions, rather than averaging them out into a meaningless “mean”.

  • http://zachriel.blogspot.com/2005/07/liberal-v-conservative.html Zachriel

    Zachriel: For fewer than 100 employees, the national average is 24.57 businesses per 1000 people. In San Francisco, it is 27.65, or about 12% more than the average.

    Moose: OK. What does this new statistic have to do with less than businesses with less than 10 ee’s? This is a strange dance your performing. Where should we go next? I got it, let’s see how many businesses are have between 43 and 63 ee’s.

    Different studies use different measures. In order to compare cities, you have to use comparable statistics.
     
    Moose: Here’s one for your books: For-Hire Truck Tonnage Index decresaed 2.9% in February.

    That’s the national number. It fell after reaching its highest point since mid-2008. Winter storms account for part of it. Did you have a point? 
     

  • http://zachriel.blogspot.com/2005/07/liberal-v-conservative.html Zachriel

    Charles Martel: I think Zac{hriel} comes here because he knows he has finally reached a place where his leftist nonsense gets called.

    What you mean is that when the original contention is shown to be incorrect, and handwaving isn’t working, you declare victory.
     
    Charles Martel: The entrepreneurial shops that Zac{hriel} cites, such as Twitter, keep a corporate presence in San Francisco for reasons of prestige and ready access to the city’s lawyers and bankers.

    Twitter was born in San Francisco, as were many other businesses. 
     
    Charles Martel: Once again, Zac{hriel} does not bother to think about why S.F. seems to be such a hot bed of small businesses. 

    There are a number of reasons, including a highly educated and motivated workforce. There is currently a lot of money flowing into new startups in San Francisco.

  • Charles Martel

    Zacky, I hate to quote myself like you quote yourself, but you left out my money sentence:

    “Since Zack is a game player, it could be that he is using this site as a teaching tool for his fellow basementeers: Here’s how to incite by saying silly things and stealing other peoples’ ideas. Of course the unwanted part of the lesson is when his observers note that he does routinely get his clocked cleaned.”

    Score: Martel’s handwaves 1,000; Zacky’s basement antics 0.

  • suek

    They’re not doing much for those “small” businesses…
     
    http://directorblue.blogspot.com/2011/04/democrat-math-even-kooks-running-san.html

  • Charles Martel

    suek, did your link come from a Zach-approved source?

  • http://ymarsakar.wordpress.com Ymarsakar

    I think Zac{hriel}-Z

    He’s doing it again Martel.  Do ya see? Do ya see it?

  • http://ymarsakar.wordpress.com Ymarsakar

    What you mean is that when the original contention is shown to be incorrect,

    Shown by whom to be incorrect. You? You think you showed something here? *chuckles*

  • Charles Martel

    He’s very formal, Ymar. I think he may be a Brit, which would explain his problems with subject-number agreement (for example, referring to the city of San Francisco as a “they”). In which case leaving off the second half of his alias would vex him greatly. Kind of like calling the Prince of Wales “Chuck” or “Your Stiffness.”

    Speaking of, Ymar, you and anybody else here are welcome to call me Chazz, Chuck, Moor Killer, Zach Slayer, C.M. Hammer, whatever.

  • Moose

    Z: “Did you have a point?”

    Exactly my point. Thank you for picking that up. Random statistics skimmed from web sites don’t prove a point.

  • Danny Lemieux

    Is it Zachriel…or Azariel?

    Just askin’!

    Feeling kinda puckish this morning.