No President Daniels in 2012 *UPDATED*

Do I mind that Mitch is out in 2012?  No.  Even though I understand that he’s a stellar government executive, with some good (although not great) conservative chops, I could not like him.  I would have voted for him on the ABO (Anyone But Obama) principle, but I wouldn’t have liked it.

Of course, 2012 is not helped by Krauthammer, a respected conservative commentator, essentially calling Cain a joke.  As it is, I’m hearing from more and more people — blog friends and people I talk to in the real world — who are impressed by Cain’s life experience, his personality, his skill set and his ethics.  While he may not have worked in government, his executive experience far exceeds that of past candidates, such as Obama, Kerry or McCain.

I’m watching Cain very carefully.  If he can get past a media that will subject him to a lynching that makes the attacks on Clarence Thomas and Condi Rice look like a picnic, I think he’s a real possibility.  The ticket would almost certainly have to be balanced by someone who has wandered through the government for a few years, and I’m still thinking John Bolton.

UPDATE:  Cain will have a problem with beltway thinking, nicely encapsulated in this paragraph by John Podhoretz (a commentator I respect and admire):

The candidate for president who best stands the chance of earning the gadfly-with-breakout-potential trophy is Herman Cain, the former CEO of Godfather’s Pizza who went viral even in pre-YouTube days by confronting Bill Clinton at a health-care forum back in 1994. Cain did well with focus-group watchers after the first GOP debate in South Carolina. He formally announced his candidacy today. But the question now is not, Can Herman Cain win? He almost certainly can’t, and shouldn’t; he’s never held elective office and the presidency has not an entry-level position for anyone but Eisenhower, the victor of World War II.

I think it’s worth mentioning that we’ve had two entry level presidents, not just one:  Obama and Eisenhower.  Obama has been a disaster; Eisenhower was a success.  I think it’s not political experience that matters, it’s life experience, values and intelligence.  The former lacked it, the latter didn’t.  Cain is more of an Eisenhower than he is an Obama.

UPDATE II:  On the other hand, here’s a serious red flag “uh-oh” about Cain.  It turns out he has the same problem that bedeviled Palin in 2008:  he’s simply not au courant on hot topic political issues.  We know he’ll find his way to the right answer, but he’ll probably fall down the political well before he gets there.

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  • Mike Devx

    Book: The ticket would almost certainly have to be balanced by someone who has wandered through the government for a few years, and I’m still thinking John Bolton.

    Oooh, Book, when you mentioned John Bolton, my heart leaped and thumped in a way that had me reaching for me cell-phone.  ["9-1-1!  It's the big one!  ("You hear that Elizabeth I'm coming to join you honey!") as Fred would say.]  

    I’d forgotten all about John Bolton.  I think he’d be more effective for our interests as Secretary of State than as Vice President.  But if he’s still willing to serve, he’d be awesome.  He knows the foreign policy game inside and out, in all ways.  His 2007 book “Surrender Is Not An Option” is an inside look at the diplomacy game, detailed and illuminating, expert and entertaining!  I highly recommend the entire book, start to finish.

    Cain still has to go through the normal vetting process.  There’s a lot we don’t know yet.  (Of course, Obama, via the nefarious complicity of the MSM, never had to go through the normal vetting process, so why start now?)

    Herman Cain has everything it takes to emerge as a front-running candidate. He would then be subject to the kind of one-sided, thoroughly coordinated smear campaign the likes of which only Sarah Palin has endured in my memory.  (I still remember the stories in those few days following her speech when McCain introduced her.  All those MSM types and Obama operatives suddenly cancelling their plans, gathering for that Monday morning (Tuesday morning?) meeting and phone conference in Washington D.C., soon followed by the mass migration of their underlings to Alaska, and then the message, coordinated across all of the MSM shows, all speaking in concert, laying down all the echo-chamber assault lines…  And Sarah, as VP duty bound to follow the deficient McCain script, and subject to back-stabbing McCain-staff traitors, and perhaps being too naive and unready, never responded and never recovered.)

    No V.P. slot for Herman Cain.  You’re too duty-bound, required to be a good soldier in the service of someone else’s message, in that role.  One of his major strengths is that he speaks his mind, with clarity and strength.

    Cain has complete command and control of the bully pulpit – that is surprising to me.  Reagan was likely better, but Reagan had years in front of audiences and the camera, as an actor, spokesman and government official, to prepare for 1980.  You gotta love this new line, too:
    “We need a leader, not a reader.”
    His new slogan for something he’s been saying, “… and I don’t need a teleprompter.  Every word you hear is from my head and from my heart.”

    Another good one I first saw this morning:
    “The Herminator!”

    If he survives the vetting and the assault, if he puts the foreign policy concerns to rest… look out.

  • jj

    Don’t know where Podhoretz went to school, but clearly history wasn’t much of an issue wherever it was.  It was an entry-level position for all the generals, not just Eisenhower.  That’s a group that includes Washington, Grant, Taylor, Jackson – I know I’m missing a couple. 

    We do pretty well with people who’ve run something.  States, armies – the experience has been mostly good.  People who never ran anything, whose only experience has been in government (other than governors, who do have responsibilities) like congressmen and senators are usually not so good.  The only time the country had three such tyros at running anything in office in a row, we got the Civil War.  It’s never happened again.  We like proven executives, which people whose only experience is in congress, either house, are not.  As Obama is amply demonstrating.  

  • http://ymarsakar.wordpress.com Ymarsakar

    Krauthammer is a conservative elitist. Not as bad as Nancy Pelosi but in his world of talking heads, credentials matter and only certain types of credentials. Cain doesn’t have the requisite “stuff” you may say for K to give his seal of approval. That’s just how K thinks. But I don’t think like that.

  • http://ymarsakar.wordpress.com Ymarsakar

    Sorry wrong word choice. Not as bad as Peggy Noonan. PN-NP.

  • http://ymarsakar.wordpress.com Ymarsakar

    he’s simply not au courant on hot topic political issues.

    It’s actually better that they don’t jump to conclusions before becoming President. Capable leaders don’t make decisions until they are required to and have the necessary resources to back it up.

  • Mike Devx

    jj #2: We like proven executives, which people whose only experience is in congress, either house, are not.  As Obama is amply demonstrating. I agree completely.  On this topic, Herman Cain’s leadership credentials are in business, not military.  He has been a business executive, in charge, for much of his career. He’s not been merely in business, he’s led them. His record indicates a string of successes in that role.   (Caveat: More in-depth info needed and will come.)

    Obama’s only claim to a leadership role upon entering the adult world was as a community organizer.  The shocking thing is how unsuccessful he was even at that.  (With Ayers, the Annenberg Challenge program.  With Tony Rezco, corrupt efforts via the Chicago Housing Authority to “restore Chicago neighborhoods” that ended up lining powerful developers’ pockets with a lot of money while simultaneously “turning housing for the poor into even more horrific slums”.)

    Obama’s leadership successes outside of campaign politics couldn’t fill one side of a 1×1 notecard.   The MSM normally would have laughed such a candidate out of town – had it any tiny fragment of journalistic ethics remaining.

  • Mike Devx

    IF you’re unfamiliar with Obama’s Tony Rezco/Chicago Housing Authority monstrosity, this is a good place to start:

    http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2008/06/27/grim_proving_ground_for_obamas_housing_policy/

  • stanley

    I would support Cain for the same reason I would support Palin- and for the same reason Podhoretz and other beltway pundits would not- that they have not held elective office for long periods of time means they have fewer obligations to the establishment in their party. The Repubs are just as corrupt as the Dems- witness that no matter who is pres we get the same things: more taxes, bigger govt, more regulations less freedom. I don’t think you have to have all the answers to all the questions that the media might put before you while on the spot. Nobody has all the answers, but I believe that at least Cain and Palin have (some) core values that you can base what their answer will be on virtually any question,  as opposed to checking the polls first before offering an opinion or position. Witness today Obama backtracking  on his recent Israel gaffs to the AIPAC. It was reported than the AIPAC audience then gave him a standing O. Do these people really believe that he didn’t say what he clearly said? I truly do not understand the American Jew, but the left clearly understands their constituency and gullibility

  • http://ymarsakar.wordpress.com Ymarsakar

    he’s never held elective office and the presidency has not an entry-level position for anyone but Eisenhower, the victor of World War II.

    What kind of fat cat corruptocrat believes that the Ruling Class requires its members to have certain requirements before being inducted into the highest office in the land, eh? Is this country ruled by citizens or is it ruled by the Political Class of Fat, Greedy, Corrupt, Bastardos?

    Riddle me that.

  • http://ymarsakar.wordpress.com Ymarsakar

    Oh I see, Eisenhower managed to win the war singlehandedly. The Victory of WWII. Thanks for the history lesson, Pod.

  • http://ymarsakar.wordpress.com Ymarsakar

    After Wallace explained the Palestinian demand to return to the homes they were “thrown out of” [sic!] in 1948, Cain said that would be negotiated between the Israelis and Palestinians. “I don’t think Israel has any problem with Palestinians’ returning,” he said.

    The “right of return” is designed to fool people that aren’t aware of its insidious underpinnings. More than half of America and more than 3/5ths of the intellectual class were fooled by Soviet propaganda. And even today, the majority of the “intellectual class” are on board with communist and community Leftist organization propaganda.

    The idiots in the status quo power circles don’t have much of a leg to stand on talking about what people should know now.

    Thats because in my eyes, ALL of them were tools in the service of communist and Alinsky propaganda. All of them. None of them ever got it. None of them ever did a damn thing to fight back effectively. None of them. The only people that figured it came from the Left. The only people and they weren’t even in powerful positions.

    The right of Palestinians who voluntarily moved in 1948 is about the same size as the dwindling WWII generation GIs. You think Cain would have an issue with them moving back into Israel?

    These are Beltway culture people expecting the “new guy” to mouth and say the same things they always say to their friends. But they misunderstand something. Even if they comprehended the entirety of Leftist and Palestinian war strategies, they wouldn’t have the spine to do anything about them. I take will to fight over understanding any day of the week. Understanding comes with time and patience. But those in DC that never had a backbone to fight against Leftist encroachment into the heartland of America, have no horse to stand on when lecturing other people about policy questions.

    It’s almost as if you can get elected President if you mouth the right words. Actually, THAT IS WHAT HAPPENED. For the freaks in DC love listening to the right words.

  • expat

    Eisenhower may not have had experience in congress, but he certainly knew how alliances worked.
     
    Cain’s not knowing what right of return means shows that he hasn’t been following foreign affairs.  Even if you lack hands-on experience in this area,  you should have been following the situation in the Islamic world since 9/11 and you should know how Arab countries have been playing the refugee card over the years.  It does take some time to learn the doublespeak and spin of diplomacy and to develop a healthy skepticism about the allegations and assertions of our enemies. Events may not give you the time you need to get up to snuff.  Cain is a straight-talking and capavle executive, but I would like see him take on one of our bloated and dysfunctional  federal agencies rather than having summits with world leaders.

  • Mike Devx

    Ymar #11: 
    > The right of Palestinians who voluntarily moved in 1948 is about the same size as the dwindling WWII generation GIs. You think Cain would have an issue with them moving back into Israel?

    > These are Beltway culture people expecting the “new guy” to mouth and say the same things they always say to their friends.  [...] I take will to fight over understanding any day of the week.

    Ymar, exactly right, I agree.

    Cain is a very direct man.  He asked Chris Wallace to define the right of return.  He had to ask him twice!  Then he got Chris Wallace’ answer, and he answered, precisely, Chris Wallace’s question.  That’s how a business executive operates. If there’s any fault here, it’s in Chris Wallace’s formulation of the question.  

    See for yourselves!  Here is the text of that portion of the interview.  (Took a lot of back and forth with the video to get all of this written down!)  

    See where you think Cain made a mistake beyond not engaging in, as Ymar put it “Beltway culture people expecting the “new guy” to mouth and say the same things they always say”

    ———-
    (begin)

    Chris Wallace: Where do you stand on the right of return?
     
    Herman Cain: The right of return?
     
    <No response>
     
    Cain: The right of return?
     
    Wallace: The Palistinian right of return.
     
    Cain: That’s something that should be negotiated.  That’s something that should be negotiated.  They-
     
    Wallace: Do you think the Palestinian refugees, the people that were kicked out of the land in 1948, should be able or should have any right to return to Israeli land?
     
    Cain: Yes, but not under Palestinian conditions.  Yes. They should have a right to come back if that is a decision that Israel wants to make. Come back to – it’s up to Israel to determine the things that they will accept.
     
    Cain, continuing: Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu made it real clear in his statement following the statement that President Obama made.  They are willing to make some concessions. They’re willing to give on a lot of thngs.  they’re willing to be compassionate.  I don’t think they have a big problem with people returning. The issue is, there are some things that they’re simply not willing to give in on.
    (end)
    ———

    expat 12: Cain’s not knowing what right of return means shows that he hasn’t been following foreign affairs.

    I will agree to that.  I have the same take: I don’t think Herman Cain was aware of what the phrase “right of return” currently means.  I like, though, how he then requested a precise definition and – when he got a substantive exact question – then answered it precisely.

    But that tendency is going to get him into trouble with hostile questioners.  And trust me, all of those hostile questioners in the MSM have taken note of this, and they’re setting him up, in their heads, even now.  Salivating, I bet!  He’d better be ready, or they’re going to eat him alive.

    I expect him to be ready.  He does not strike me as a naive man.

  • jj

    I agree with Mike – Cain asked for a clarification of the question, got it, then proceeded with his thoughts.  I don’t actually have a problem with that.  In fact if more politicians were sufficiently honest to say: “beats the hell out of me – I don’t know everything, but I’ll find out” (Obama could do it ten times a day) we’d all be better off and there’d be a lot less blather promulgated.  When did time for thought become a bad thing?  I’ll take that as opposed to shooting from the hip any day.
     
    I don’t have much of a problem with his answer, either.  Yeah, the Palestinians can return and live side by side with the Israelis – but not on their own terms.  Given Israel’s history, I doubt they would object – they’ve shown a willingness to live with and work with just about anybody.  (They keep getting defecated on for it, but they seem to me to remain hopeful.)   If the Palestinians would recognize that they don’t get to set the rules, and they have to cease behaving like mad dogs, make an effort to get along, and refrain from being a running sore – does anyone doubt that Israel would say okay?
     
    Israel has a history of being pretty damn good about this.  Let us remember, Israel has had nuclear weapons for decades.  Yet Syria’s still there.  Lebanon’s still there.  Jordan’s still there.  The Gaza strip is still there.  Egypt is still there.  Does anyone in the room doubt that if any of them had nuclear weapons Israel would not still be there?  Israel is the adult in a room full of children – singularly backward children, at that.  Their patience and willingness to try to work with and play nice with others has been exemplary – for decades.  I know I would not have been so patient.