Kinky Friedman applauds Rick Perry

It’s not an official endorsement, but what Kinky Friedman has to say about Perry is just as good as an official endorsement.  And unlike most celebrity political writing (“my candidate will save the world and give everyone a unicorn, plus a really cool swag bag”), Friedman’s got some specifics:

More to the point, could Rick Perry fix the economy? Hell, yes! Texas is exhibit A; Rick’s fingerprints are all over it. He’s been governor since Christ was a cowboy. The Lone Star State is booming. The last time I checked, Texas is kicking in a hell of a lot of the U.S. GDP. Unemployment is lower than the vast majority of the other states. Hell, we could probably even find a job for Paul Begala.

Friedman is also very specific about Perry’s abiding love for Israel, something that every Jew who cares about Israel should note:

As a Jewish cowboy (or “Juusshh,” as we say in Texas), I know Rick Perry to be a true friend of Israel, like Bill Clinton and George W. before him. There exists a visceral John Wayne kinship between Israelis and Texans, and Rick Perry gets it. That’s why he’s visited Israel on many more occasions than Obama, who’s been there exactly zero times as president. If I were Obama I wouldn’t go either. His favorability rating in Israel once clocked in at 4 percent. Say what you will about the Israelis, but they are not slow out of the chute. They know who their friends are. On the topic of the Holy Land, there remains the little matter of God. God talks to televangelists, football coaches, and people in mental hospitals. Why shouldn’t he talk to Rick Perry? In the spirit of Joseph Heller, I have a covenant with God. I leave him alone and he leaves me alone. If, however, I have a big problem, I ask God for the answer. He tells Rick Perry. And Rick tells me.

Mr. Bookworm was less specific in his dislike for Perry.  As best as I could figure, he saw some segment on some TV show that had something to do with an execution in Texas that in some way involved a political cover-up and he thought Perry was “smarmy.”  So he’s not going to vote for the man.  Yeah.

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Comments

  1. Gringo says

    I never voted for Rick Perry, but voted several times for Governor  Kinkster. He got 12.6% of the vote in 2006.  While I don’t agree with all that Rick Perry has said, I like his blunt speech and they way he pisses off so many people. Electability? I don’t know.
     
    The brother of an acquaintance of mine had Kinky for his cabin counselor one summer. Kinky’s parents operated a summer camp in the hill country.
     
    Here are some songs from the Kinkster, who does his best to offend all sides of the political spectrum. He was politically incorrect before there was political incorrectness.
     
    Kinky’s stance on gay marriage went something like this:  “I am for gay marriage. Gays have as much right to be miserable as straights.”
     
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0JEJNKqo70g They Ain’t Makin’ Jews Like Jesus Anymore http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UO8sD81NVTg  Get your Biscuits in the Oven

  2. NancyB says

    Dear Bookworm, I really, really want to like Rick Perry – but didn’t like his Gardisil moment, his NY gay marriage comments or his almost ”smarmy”, too glossy (is that a toupee or dyed hair?) appearance.   I wonder if he is all he appears or just another Politician?
    That said, I agree with Gringo – love his blunt speech – just hope that what you see is what you get. On a more personal note (and I hope you don’t mind) It must be hard for you, a true conservative, to be married to a liberal.   

  3. NewEnglandDevil says

    The following are from: http://peskytruth.wordpress.com/2011/07/19/rick-perrys-negatives/
    10. Perry refused to consider commuting the execution of Mexican national Humberto Leal Garcia even though it had been requested by the U.N. and the White House
    Humberto Leal Garcia was sentenced to death for the 1994 rape and murder of a 16-year-old girl. Leal, a mechanic, was born in Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico, in 1973 and moved to the USA when he was two years old, but never became a United States citizen. He was an illegal immigrant.
    On May 21, 1994, Leal kidnapped, raped, tortured, and murdered 16-year-old Adria Sauceda. Police discovered the girl’s nude body on a dirt road in San Antonio in May 1994. Evidence showed she had been gang-raped, bitten, strangled and bludgeoned to death.
    She and Leal had been attending a party not far from where she was found. She became intoxicated at the party and Leal is said to have offered to drive her home. Leal carried an intoxicated semi-conscious Sauceda into his car. When Leal placed Sauceda in his car she was clothed. When Sauceda’s body was later discovered she was nude.
    Leal was the last known individual to see Sauceda alive.  
    Official court documents state “There was a 30- to 40-pound asphalt rock roughly twice the size of the victim’s skull lying partially on the victim’s left arm; Blood was underneath this rock. A smaller rock with blood on it was located near the victim’s right thigh.” There was also a 15 inch long stick extending out of her vagina, with a screw at the end. Leal claimed that she fell and hit her head. No one was charged in the gang rape.
    Among other evidence, the bite mark was matched to Leal. Her bloody blouse was found at Leal’s home, and Leal confessed to police and his brother that he had killed Sauceda.
    The complaint is that even though the 38-year-old Mexican national had lived in the United States since he was 2 years old, he was not granted access to the Mexican consul prior to making incriminating statements (his confession).
    In a letter to Texas Governor Rick Perry, the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights asked that he commute the sentence to life in prison. “If the scheduled execution of Mr. Leal Garcia goes ahead, the United States government will have implemented a death penalty after a trial that did not comply with due process rights,” said Christof  Heyns, the U.N.  Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions. “This will be tantamount to an arbitrary deprivation of life.”
    In its 30-page brief, the Obama administration said that complying with its obligations to notify consuls in such cases would serve U.S.interests as well as those of the condemned man. “It would place the United States in irreparable breach of its international-law obligation to provide consular notification and assistance under the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations,” wrote Solicitor General Donald B. Verrilli Jr., in a friend-of-the-court brief.
    Leal had the benefit of 45 separate hearings and appeals before his execution and his guilt was beyond question.
    Update: On July 7, 2011, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to stay the execution on a 5-4 vote and Leal was executed via lethal injection. In his last minutes, Humberto Leal repeatedly said he was sorry and accepted responsibility – admitting his actions for the first time since his original confession, “I have hurt a lot of people. … I take full blame for everything. I am sorry for what I did,” he said in the death chamber before shouting twice, “Viva Mexico!”.
    11. Cameron Todd Willingham – was he an innocent man?
    This is a troubling case. Willingham was executed by lethal injection in 2004 after being convicted of setting a fire that killed his three daughters before Christmas 1991. But his case and the ensuing controversy frame the death penalty in a new way: whether Perry used his power as governor to try to dodge responsibility for presiding over the execution of a potentially innocent man. Again, that term “presiding” – a term specifically designed to make it appear that he had more responsibility in the execution than is true.
    At Willingham’s trial, Texas fire investigators said they found clear indicators that the fire at the Willingham home in the small town of Corsicana had been intentionally set. By the time of  Willingham’s execution in February, 2004, the science of fire investigation had dramatically advanced and what investigators had for decades considered telltale signs of arson were no longer considered reliable.
    In the final days before Willingham was put to death, his lawyer filed with the courts a report from Gerald Hurst, one of the nation’s most renowned fire scientists. Hurst’s four-page report asserted for the first time in the case that the indicators of arson the investigators cited had been debunked by scientific advances. The fire, Hurst concluded, might well have been an accident – he did not state categorically that it was an accident. Perry reviewed the report and determined it did not present new information, only new opinion. He also decided it did not merit a stay of execution.
    Under Texas law, the Governor can only issue a one-time temporary 30-day stay of execution. Any other clemency or commutation of sentence must be recommended to the Governor by the state’s Pardons and Paroles board. None was forthcoming in the Willingham case.
    Lucy Nashed, a Perry spokeswoman said, “Willingham’s conviction was reviewed and upheld by multiple levels of state and federal courts, including nine federal courts – four times by the U.S. Supreme Court alone – over the course of more than a decade.”
    The Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles reviewed the latest evidence and refused to recommend that Governor Perry act in this case. Governor Perry independently decided that the evidence did not warrant a stay and he allowed Willingham’s execution to proceed in accordance with his responsibility as Governor.
    Did Texas execute an innocent man? In a case that could not have been overturned based on something as definitive as DNA evidence and seven years after the 2004 execution, there’s no way to be 100% sure, but under Texas law, the most that Perry could have done was issue a single 30-day stay. When someone takes the position that Willingham was “innocent,” that person is intentionally ignoring all of the legal maneuvers that occurred and is basing that determination on “feelings.” He was never deemed “innocent” by any legal authority.
    If one Googles ”Cameron Todd Willingham” the majority of the hits will be different shadings of the same story line, that of those against the death penalty (Innocence Project, etc.). Every attempt is made to cast doubt on the evidence that Willingham was guilty, especially using quotes from “experts” in the field of fire science. The problem is that many of the quotes are massaged to remove any doubt and make them appear as unquestioned facts, when most stated that the fire could have been accidental. For someone really interested in the truth of the case, one must also have access to the other side of the issue. Here is a link to an interview with the Dallas Morning News by Dudley Sharp who was investigating the “innocence” of Willingham. Willingham’s “innocence” was never established, and none of his appeals gave the appellate courts reason to call for a new trial.
    The charge that Perry was knowingly complicit in executing an innocent man is without merit. He rejected the last evidence (the Hurst report) as a reason to stay Willingham’s execution, just as the US Supreme Court, the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals and the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals had. His case was tried, appealed, and adjudicated according to the law.
    But Perry’s critics don’t give up so easily. As another point of attack, they accuse him of replacing the members of the Forensics Science Commission (FSC) two days before the formal hearing because, they maintain, the commission was going to submit a finding that did not support the governor’s position on Willingham’ s guilt.
    Not only is that position based on an incorrect supposition, it is also obviously biased.
    Perry did replace the members because: 1) their terms had expired and appointing new members was standard policy, and 2) pushing back the date of the FSC hearing would allow more time for the Corsicana Fire Department (CFDR) and Texas Fire Marshall’s office (TFMR) to respond to the Beyler report (BR). Both were expected to be critical of the Beyler Report. Pushing back the date of the formal hearing also gave the new FSC members time to get up to speed on the details of the case.
    The preliminary CFDR blasted the BR on some obvious and important points, making over a hundred comments and corrections to Beyler’s 19 page review of the Willingham case. It made the case that the Beyler report was both inaccurate and biased. The final determination awaits completed CFDR and TFMR reports.
     

  4. dbkenner says

    Humberto Leal Garcia was a diaper stain. I would’ve killed him myself if the state of Texas had let me.
    The other case is a non-issue, as you point out. Perry could’ve only stayed the execution for 30 days. Besides, the picture of Willingham moving his car away from the burning house (as neighbors said) while his daughters burned inside is enough for me. This is a guy who claims his daughter woke him up on the couch, but then cannot account for the fact that he left the house but his daughter stayed inside. What a joke.
    I hope Perry wins and Kinky throws him a party at the White House.
    Nice blog, by the way.

  5. Mike Devx says

    > he saw some segment on some TV show [...] and he thought Perry was “smarmy.”  So he’s not going to vote for the man. 

    Looks like just another excuse-du-jour for not voting for a conservative.  Has Mr. Bookworm ever voted for a conservative?  Does he like *any* of the conservative candidates?

    Just asking.  Looks to me that if it hadn’t been “smarmy”, it would have been “glossy”, or, “his eyes are too close together”.  Or something.

    Rick Perry is one hell of an effective politician – it’s not a piece of cake to defeat Kay Bailey Hutchison here in Texas, and he did it with ease.   That counts a great deal for me, when I consider a candidate who must run not only against Obama and his massive campaign war chest, but against the Media as well.

     

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