Is there something missing from this story about the OWS attempt to shut down the Port of Oakland?

As I was up early, I listened to KSFO’s Brian Sussman show.  A man called in, identified himself as someone who works at the Port of Oakland, and described with some amusement the eight or so luxury buses that pulled up, disgorging a bunch of people in their 30s and 40s, completely with mass-produced signs, who then set up trying to block the port.  He was pretty sure the bus company was Galactic, which is amusing, because this company offers “party” buses.  I wonder if the Galactic people knew what party they were hosting.

What’s peculiar is that I read the SF Chronicle’s account of this morning’s strike, and the Chronicle makes no mention of the buses, instead describing the protesters as walking to the site from BART:

Carrying signs saying “Shutdown Wall St. on the Waterfront” about 200 protesters marched the three blocks from the West Oakland BART Station to the port entrances before sunrise today.

Was the caller making it up?  Did the reporters not see the buses?  Did the reporters see the buses but ignore them, deliberately or because they failed to understand their import?  I don’t know.  I’m just asking questions here.
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  • Charles Martel

    Whether the caller was telling the truth or not, the pith here is that you, Book, and I, and hundreds of thousands of others reflexively distrust the San Francisco Chronicle.
     
    If its managers and staffers weren’t so immersed in political correctness and a smugness that conflates glibness on paper with real intellect, they might wonder why only one out of every 30 people who live in the Bay Area metro region subscribes to their pravda.

  • http://photoncourier.blogspot.com David Foster

    There are 2 non-US ports emerging as alternatives to the US West Coast posts: Lazaro Cardenas in Mexico, and Prince Rupert in Canada. With intermodal transfers to rail, these will represent viable gateways for significant amounts of US import and export traffic.

    “Progressive” attacks on the US ports, if they continue, will certainly have an impact in shifting traffic to these alternatives. 

  • MacG

    Which means David, less idling diesel trucks and fossil fuel burnt in the bay area and a path to meeting clean air standards.  Of course they will have to complete the environment destroying Trans Pacific Highway from Mexico to Canada first.  SO that diesel truck form Mexico that do not have the USA smog regs imposed can flow freely through our Nation from bottom to top and back again but hey what evs. 
    This is like the fact that we can extract oil more cleanly than any other nation but pay, er, uh, ‘invest’ 2 billion in Brazil to develop their oil fields so the progs can ease their Borg collective PC (Progressive Change?) NIMBY consciousness of any environmental damage because they can’t see it from their house.

  • http://furtheradventuresofindigored.blogspot.com/ Indigo Red

    I, too, was listening to a radio program about occupy Oakland Ports; it was the Sac city npr station. Anyway, they had a cell call to a UC Davis occupierwho went to the port not at the specified 5:30AM, but showed up at 7. The cell girl said she was there to protest the low wages paid to drivers claiming drivers were paid only $50.00/day. The Union driver who was in studio said drivers actually make about $500.00/day.

  • http://ymarsakar.wordpress.com Ymarsakar

    War requires the sinews of money to be made. No money, no war either.

     Where has the Left been getting their money?

  • http://ymarsakar.wordpress.com Ymarsakar

    MacG, Brazil offered a few million of the “vig” or palm grease for politicians. Politicians saw the amount of bribes the they getting from US oil, and said “brazillians got bigger grease so we go with Brazil”. Oil companies are restricted from sending politicians too much money in the US. Conveniently, that’s not the case with foreign companies.

     

  • Zhombre

    Great news for port facilities in the Gulf of Mexico, once the Panama Canal is able to accommodate wider shipping. While California continues to commit economic hara-kiri, Texas, Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana and Florida pick up the slack.