Happy music from Germany (with some Swiss performers thrown in)

When I was a kid, my father had records of schuhplattler music that I loved listening to. This reminds me a great deal of that music. Very cheerful stuff, including the Italian music thrown in.

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  1. Gringo says

    So nice I listened to it twice.
    German folk music has taken root in the Western Hemisphere, especially in Texas and Northern Mexico. The polkas and accordions that Germans fleeing the 1848 failed revolutions brought to Central Texas were adapted by the Hispanics living in the area. It has also percolated across the border to Mexico: Norteña music features polkas and the accordion. The yodeling in country and western music  came from the German and Slavic immigrants to Texas.
     
    While Bill Haley is best known as one of the founding fathers of rock and roll, his first ventures in music were in a Western Swing band – in Pennsylvania.
     
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hcGyIjTq2hc Bill Haley:  Yodel Your Blues Away https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lFY__aLIdQQ Santiago Jimenez Jr. : Polka Time https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QIwK5xOMpAM  Valerio Longoria plays the Texas Polka – La Bamba

  2. Danny Lemieux says

    That was definitely a palate cleanser. I shared it with my family.
    When I was a young and dashing lad, my very first date with my now-spouse of many years was to a cultural presentation given by Tibetan folk artists at our university (this was not long after China had invaded Tibet and chased Tibetans to India and Switzerland). I was surprised to see that the Tibetans, too, yodeled and blew crazy long horns. Like the Germans and Swiss, they developed these skills to communicate across deep mountain valleys. Obviously, my waay-gorgeous date was very impressed with my good taste in bringing her to such a great event.

  3. Gringo says

    Happy music from Germany (with some Swiss performers thrown in)
     
    That would have been my assumption. The “Amore Fantastico” was a giveaway for Swiss/Italian language- though it also could have pointed to South Tyrol. The YouTube link has the performers. I have added where I found out their nationalities.
     
    Nicolas Senn – Quöllfrisch – Google
    Oesch’s die Dritten – Ku-Ku Jodel – German Wiki
    Yasmine-Melanie – Amore Fantastico – German Wiki
    Lisa Stoll – Tanz der Kühe –   German Wiki
    Florian & Seppli – Familienjodler – Google
     
    I looked them up on either the German language edition of Wikipedia or Google: All of the five groups or performers are Swiss. All of them. Or as German language Wiki says, Schweizer.
     
    The TV show from which came this video  was apparently conceived from the beginning to feature music of the southern German speakers, not just of southern Germany.  Google translate of the German Wiki:
     
    The Musikantenstadl is a live entertainment show broadcast on public television with folk music, brass band, popular classical music, German pop music and international entertainment. The show is a co-production in the euro vision and touring Austria, Germany, Switzerland and South Tyrol. Producer is the ORF in cooperation with the Bavarian Radio and the Swiss television.
     
    Country of production: Germany, Switzerland, Austria, South Tyrol (Italy)
     
    At their start was a feature of the show that the production of the show was not limited to a fixed location. The program is mainly produced in different cities of Austria, Germany and Switzerland.
     [Google Translate does a much better job for German than it does for Spanish.]
     One thing I learned in my time in Latin America was that if you wanted to get a cold reception from a Swiss,  just ask them if they were German.  Ditto the Dutch. [As for myself, I have ancestors from both Switzerland  and Germany - and other countries.]
    https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Hauptseite

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