Narcotics blogging

imageI don’t usually take narcotics — indeed, I assiduously avoid them — but I’m making an exception for the next few days, which make affect the quality of my blogging.

I went to the hospital this morning for an outpatient meniscus trimming in my knee and for a look-see at what was going on under my patella. Last time I had the surgery, I was walking the next day, so that’s what. I expected this time. Wrong!

I came home an hour ago on crutches, and will be unable to bear any weight for six weeks. Every night, I need to be hooked up to a machine that constantly moves my joint.

Inconvenient, but here are the good things — just coincidentally, my older kid (I hope) qualifies for a driver’s license (thanks to a long-standing appointment with the DMV); and can therefore do the shopping; with luck, and I may have a usable knee for another ten years.

Here’s what happened: When he opened me up, my surgeon discovered that my cartilage was all gone (explaining the pain). He therefore drilled holes into my bone to reach stem cells. The hope is that the constant motion at night, when combined I found it uplifting, Rob. I needed that today. I went into Kaiser this morning for an outpatient meniscus trimming in my knee and for a look-see at what was going on under my patella. I came home an hour ago on crutches, and will be unable to bear any weight for six weeks. Every night, I need to be hooked up to a machine that constantly moves my joint.

Inconvenient, but here are the good things — my daughter (I hope) qualifies for her driver’s license Wednesday and can therefore do the shopping, and I may have a usable knee for another ten years.

Once he opened me up, my surgeon discovered that my cartilage was all gone. He therefore drilled holes into my bone to reach the marrow. The hope is that the constant motion at night, when combined with the exposed stem cells, will encourage my body to grow new cartilage. Pretty cool, right?

I don’t quite know what the next day or two hold in terms of blogging. Good stuff, I hope.

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Comments

  1. Navy Bob says

    I am not a Doctor and am in no way qualified to give medical device, but have you considered a walker instead of crutches?  Walkers are a whole lot easier to to manipulate than crutches especially if you don’t have a lot of upper arm strength.  Crutches are for young men.  My experience in this area is two total knee replacements and a wife who had a broken ankle in her “senior citizen” years.

    • says

      I have pretty good upper body strength and need to do a lot if driving. Unless they’re impossible, crutches are probably the most practical.  The real problem now is that the crutches are the wrong size — they didn’t have crutches for people 5′ tall. I can walk, but I can’t do stairs.  That has to be fixed tomorrow or else life is a problem. 

    • JKB says

      Crutches work if you don’t let your weight ride on your armpits.  Just lock the arm and swing through the step.  Only rest on the padded top when you are using your hands and then only for balance.  Doesn’t require a lot of muscle strength when you are only locking the joints.  
       
      I was much younger but did 12 weeks on crutches, two broke legs with one no weight.  After figuring out I had an infection and getting that treated, I developed fast.  Even sorted out a tennis elbow.  I’d do a mile or so on the crutches for exercise, which btw doesn’t really work when you can’t use your legs.  Only downside, when I was phasing off, tiring easy, my wrists would ache and swell for a week or two when I tired.

  2. 94Corvette says

    Book – good luck and know that you are in our thoughts and prayers.  I had my right knee replaced a year ago December and had to use a CPM for a few weeks.  We had just added a baby beagle to our family and she decided that sleeping on my chest while the machine was doing it thing was her bliss.  Like Navy Bob, I had a walker and it worked well.  I don’t know if I can tell you this but we found that Vimovo was great for killing the inflammation and it didn’t make me nauseated. 

  3. SADIE says

    OY and OUCH. Focus on yourself and not the blog. We’ll still be here while you recover. I recommend from my own experience, adjustable aluminum crutches with an arm cuff – they offer excellent and steady support.

  4. says

    Good thoughts and lots of prayers, Book, for your total recovery and your Ms. Bookwormette’s  driving test!  :)
    As for walker vs. crutches, I think it’s a personal preference.  Hubs had a total knee replacement in mid-October and found the crutches easier to use, especially on stairs and getting out of the car.  Of course, he had plenty of practice using crutches in his younger years, so there was a lot of “muscle memory” available!

  5. says

    The hope is that the constant motion at night, when combined with the exposed stem cells, will encourage my body to grow new cartilage. Pretty cool, right?
     
    Sounds like what chi circulation is supposed to do in Chinese ancient medicine. It’s interesting that Western medicine has found out similar benefits using an alternative form of tech and methodology.
     
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=GSojmSnljjU
    I mentioned TacFit before as a bodyweight regimen that you can do without using the legs. While that video is the more extreme form, it gives a good idea of what this is about.

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