Using wit, not anger, to deal with ones opposition

In an earlier post, I wrote approvingly about Greg Gutfeld’s The Joy of Hate: How to Triumph over Whiners in the Age of Phony Outrage, which focuses on a culture of outrage that requires that people — especially people on the Left — use manufactured outrage to yell down anything that doesn’t agree with their limited view of “tolerance.” When someone sent me an email with the following quotations, it occurred to me that many outraged shrieks we hear may result because Lefties are totally at a loss for words. In other words, their education has been so limited, and their intellectual materiel so sparse, they’re incapable of the type of cutting wit that was once de rigueur amongst educated (or semi-educated) people:

These glorious insults are from an era before the English language got boiled down to 4-letter words.

· “He had delusions of adequacy.” – Walter Kerr

· “He has all the virtues I dislike and none of the vices I admire.” – Winston Churchill

· “I have never killed a man, but I have read many obituaries with great pleasure.” Clarence Darrow

· “He has never been known to use a word that might send a reader to the dictionary.” – William Faulkner (about Ernest Hemingway).

· “Thank you for sending me a copy of your book; I’ll waste no time reading it.” – Moses Hadas

· “I didn’t attend the funeral, but I sent a nice letter saying I approved of it.” – Mark Twain

· “He has no enemies, but is intensely disliked by his friends..” – Oscar Wilde

· “I am enclosing two tickets to the first night of my new play; bring a friend, if you have one.” – George Bernard Shaw to Winston Churchill

· “Cannot possibly attend first night, will attend second … If there is one.” – Winston Churchill, in response.

· “I feel so miserable without you; it’s almost like having you here.” – Stephen Bishop

· “He is a self-made man and worships his creator.” – John Bright

· “I’ve just learned about his illness. Let’s hope it’s nothing trivial.” – Irvin S. Cobb

· “He is not only dull himself; he is the cause of dullness in others.” – Samuel Johnson

· “He is simply a shiver looking for a spine to run up.” – Paul Keating

· “In order to avoid being called a flirt, she always yielded easily.” – Charles, Count Talleyrand

· “He loves nature in spite of what it did to him.” – Forrest Tucker

· “Why do you sit there looking like an envelope without any address on it?” – Mark Twain

· “His mother should have thrown him away and kept the stork.” – Mae West

· “Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go.” – Oscar Wilde

· “He uses statistics as a drunken man uses lamp-posts… For support rather than illumination.” – Andrew Lang (1844-1912)

· “He has Van Gogh’s ear for music.” – Billy Wilder

· “I’ve had a perfectly wonderful evening. But this wasn’t it.” – Groucho Marx

The worst insults always come from the Left

Gay Patriot has a post up about the nasty insults he receives as a gay man.  These don’t come from right wing homophobes, though.  They come from Leftists.  Read his post and you’ll see.

I’ll only add that, aside from being green with envy that he met Glenn Reynolds, I’m not at all surprised.  The Most indecent, hate-filled insults always comes from the Left.  The names Michelle Malkin gets called are so racist, misogynistic and otherwise filthy, they defy imagination.  Same for any conservative black.  It’s no surprise to me that Leftists would pile on the bad names for a gay conservative.

There’s a word for these disgusting accusations.  Hmmm.  Let me think.  La-la-la.  I know it’ll come to me.  Protection?  Nooo.  Rejection?  No, that’s not right either.  A-ha!  I’ve got it.  Projection!

Psychological projection or projection bias is a psychological defense mechanism where a person subconsciously denies his or her own attributes, thoughts, and emotions, which are then ascribed to the outside world, usually to other people. Thus, projection involves imagining or projecting the belief that others originate those feelings

Some insults are too funny to keep to oneself

I got the funniest email today, and I just had to share it with you.  The “re” line was as follows: “Gibbering baboons more sensible than you, wingnut degenerate.” I was intrigued. The rest of the email consisted of a link to a post, along with the full text of the post in which the author explained precisely why I don’t even rank up there with gibbering baboons and, worse, I’m a “wingnut degenerate.”

I debated whether to share the link with you guys, ’cause I think the author is just trying to generate traffic.  However, because both the email title and the blog post had me laughing hysterically, I think the post author deserves some recognition.  Go here and check it out.  Then, come back to me and tell me if you can understand the author’s thesis.

I’ve read the darn post three times now and I still can’t figure out what the point is.  I know I’m a lower mammalian life form and a degenerate but, for the life of me, I don’t understand what I did to earn those interesting sobriquets.  I mean, it’s clear that I shouldn’t have said what I said, but the post author never seems to bring himself to explaining why I shouldn’t have said those things.  He sneers, but he never manages to rise to the level of thesis, fact and argument.  His post is the written equivalent of this — it definitely makes a statement, but one that reflects solely on the person making the statement, not the person at the receiving end.

Obama is effortlessly nasty

Obama was going for the type of joke you throw at the frat brother whose been your friend for decades, and with whom you’ve spent many pleasantly inebriated evenings.  It is not the type of joke you throw at the French President in a formal setting.  In this latter context, without a long friendship and a few beers, it is as mean and condescending as anything else this mean and condescending man has said over the years:


Or see here.

Everybody keeps telling me the man is charming.  I just don’t see it.  I see a self-involved, ponderous boor.

Hat tip:  Keith Koffler