Remembering a day that will live in infamy *UPDATED*

One of the most emotionally charged experiences I’ve ever had was standing in the Hawaiian sunlight, watching drop after drop of oil rise up from the USS Arizona. The past was not past — it was there, in front of me, in the water, still moving.

Let’s remember today those who died on December 7, 1941, and those who lived and fought and bled and died in the ensuing years, all to make the world safe for democracy.

UPDATE:  Read about the last survivor Pearl Harbor Medal of Honor winner here.  I was about to say that they don’t make them like that anymore, and then I stopped myself.  They do, and they’re still in America’s military.  Fortunately, not all are called to serve under such overwhelming circumstances.

UPDATE II:  No surprise that some of my favorite bloggers haven’t forgotten what today is either:

Kim Priestap

Don Surber

Terresa at The Noisy Room

Radio Patriot

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  1. Oldflyer says

    Book, I had the opportunity to serve with, and  get to know, a Pearl Harbor survivor in the mid-60s.  He was in the signal tower when the attack occurred.  The signal tower controlled ship traffic into and out of Pearl, and sat on top of a huge water tank.  So, he had a prime birds-eye view of the whole thing.
    As you know, from time immemorial, Navies have used flag hoists to signal between ships.  There was a sequence of flags that stood for “air raid”; but the signalmen on duty could not remember the sequence under the pressure of the moment, so they hoisted the alphabetical flags that spelled out “Air Raid”.  I doubt seriously that anyone was in doubt about the status, or was focused on the signal tower at that time.
    My wife remembers what she was doing when the news came over of the attack.  I don’t recall.  I am sure that on a Sunday afternoon I was very busy playing cowboys and Indians.  Not long after that our games became Marines vs Japs.

  2. Gringo says

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    I didn’t find out until after my mother’s death  that she had a boyfriend who went down with the  Arizona. Our aunt  told us the special nickname the sailor had given my mother. I think we discovered a letter from the sailor  in a scrapbook that our grandmother saved. One of the secrets that went down with the ship, I guess- at least as regards our mother not telling us anything.
     
     
    With the theme of secrets and ships going down, here are two videos that reflect that time. Here is a WW2 cartoon that warns that “Loose Lips Sink Ships.” Or at least one of the headers talks about loose lips. Whatever.
     
     
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FjRPY8Op8Xc
     
    Here is a Portuguese group interpreting Duke Ellington’s “A Slip of the Lip Can Sink a Ship. YouTube does not have the Ellington version, but tonight I  am listening to an Ellington CD that contains the Ellington version of the song
     
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yjd9NVF0FYA
    If you see a bunch of gobbletygook at the top of the posting, it is because if I delete it, the links go rogue:http://http://
     

  3. Gringo says


    I didn’t find out until after my mother’s death  that she had a boyfriend who went down with the  Arizona. Our aunt  told us the special nickname the sailor had given my mother. I think we discovered a letter from the sailor  in a scrapbook that our grandmother saved. One of the secrets that went down with the ship, I guess- at least as regards our mother not telling us anything.
     
     
    With the theme of secrets and ships going down, here are two videos that reflect that time. Here is a WW2 cartoon that warns that “Loose Lips Sink Ships.” Or at least one of the headers talks about loose lips. Whatever.
     
     
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FjRPY8Op8Xc
     
    Here is a Portuguese group interpreting Duke Ellington’s “A Slip of the Lip Can Sink a Ship. YouTube does not have the Ellington version, but tonight I  am listening to an Ellington CD that contains the Ellington version of the song
     
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yjd9NVF0FYA
    tried with deleting the gobbletygook.
     

  4. Gringo says

    With the theme of secrets and ships going down, here are two videos that reflect that time. Here is a WW2 cartoon that warns that “Loose Lips Sink Ships.” Or at least one of the headers talks about loose lips. Whatever
     http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FjRPY8Op8Xc
     
     
     
    Here is a Portuguese group interpreting Duke Ellington’s “A Slip of the Lip Can Sink a Ship. YouTube does not have the Ellington version, but tonight I  am listening to an Ellington CD that contains the Ellington version of the song

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yjd9NVF0FYA

    tried with deleting the gobbletygook.

    tried by stripping out http//: out of URL out of both
     
     

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