J.E. Dyer provides a comprehensive California voting guide

If you’re in California, it’s easy to figure out which people should get your vote:  Fiorina over Boxer, Whitman over Brown (and yes, that’s something of a nose-holder), anyone over Pelosi, etc.

It gets much more confusing when you get to the numbered items on the ballot.  Prop. 23 is easy:  Vote for that unless you want the state bankrupt in a couple of years.  But all the other numbered ones, the ones about taxes and fees and assembly majorities, are ridiculously confusing, especially since some of the tax and fee propositions appear virtually identical in wording for the confused voter, but will have markedly different outcomes if passed.

Fortunately, someone sane has stepped into this confusion.  J. E. Dyer, a former military analyst, and current blogger at Commentary’s Contentions, Hot Air’s Green Room and Patheos, also has her own blog, and it’s there that she spells out the numbers. (And yes, I did mean to be silly with my words there.  This is such a serious time that a teeny bit of humor is a nice safety valve.)

If you are a California voter, and you haven’t yet cast your vote, I urge you to study Dyer’s post very, very carefully.

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Comments

  1. suek says

    Very worthwhile article.
     
    The one thing I need help on is the judges.  Getting info on the judges that are on the ballot is really tough – and I think, important.  I’ve come to a point where I’ve recognize that our system has “gatekeepers” – and not only where you  expect.  What good does it do for legislators to make laws if the judges just throw them out?  What difference does it make if we vote, but the Secretary of State somehow manages to nullify those votes?  No doubt people have read about Illinois, where they have _hand_ delivered ballots to the jails so that the inmates can vote, but have not gotten the ballots out to the military in time for them to vote.  This sort of “gatekeeping” has been mastered by the Dems – and we need to pay more attention to the “locks”, and what it takes to restrict passage.
     
    So…I want conservative judges who will _follow_ the law – not make it.  Now…how do I get the info I need?

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