Comments

  1. says

    Actually, I would give Haltman only a “C” because he walked himself into a blind alley with his comment that there’s free speech except for shouting “fire” in a crowded theater.
    The interviewer, on the other hand, ended on the right note with the quotation from the Supreme Court’s decision in Snyder v. Phelps.

  2. says

    Haltman is right, though, about direct incitement, aimed at misinforming people.  What Jones did, however, is indirect incitement.  But I can see how, rhetorically, that distinction can be confusing.

  3. nosiafd says

    Show me the war declaration please Senator Graham for Iraq, Afghanistan or Libya?  The US is not at war, the US is participating in several military actions.   Is burning a Koran any different than beheading Daniel Pearl?  Both are reprehensible, but burning a Koran did not directly cause anyone to lose their life.

  4. Danny Lemieux says

    The burning of a Koran was offensive and obnoxious. It casts the persons who did it in disrepute. However, the murder of the UN workers was murder, pure and simple. These are two completely separate issues. 

    Finally, the moment we hold our actions in our own country hostage to the actions of peoples in other countries, we will in effect have surrendered our values and our sovereignty.

  5. says

    To Bookworm: I agree with Haltman, but he just wasn’t as effective as I though he’d be, based on your prefatory remarks.
     
    To nosiafd: Congress “declared” war, in the cases of Iraq and Afghanistan, through authorizations for the use of military force that, in both instances, were passed overwhelmingly by both houses of Congress. The Supreme Court has ruled (I forget in what case) that such authorizations satisfy the Constitution’s requirement that Congress declare war. It’s the intent that matters, not the exact wording.
     
    As for Libya, there is no such authorization, nor will there be. Congress will simply sit on its hands unless and until Obama has to seek additional funding for his Libyan adventure, which now seems unlikely. He has done his bit to assuage his European friends and to make a gesture toward Islamic militants — a gesture that will be repaid by future attacks on the West and Westerners.

  6. Mike Devx says

    So many things in American culture offend me.  What that pastor did in burning the Koran doesn’t especially spike the meter more than most of the things I see around me.

    Humans using the burning of a Koran as a reason to murder people who had nothing to do with that burning… now THAT strikes me as an outrageous offense against what it means to be human, rather than merely animal.

  7. excathedra says

    The larger issue is that Muslim barbarians and savages act out in all kinds of violent ways whenever they have their sensibilities offended…NO MATTER WHAT THE ACTUAL EVENT. It can be a cartoon, a book, a novel, an imagined sighting of the word Allah in a taco.
    And in how many cases do Westerners stand up on their hind legs and tell them to stop acting like thugs? Instead we turn on each other.
    THAT is the problem.
    Along with the fact that the loud Muslim voices in America are reserved for their victimhood narrative. Where are the American Muslims condemning this savagery?
     
     

  8. says

    Congress also approved additional spending for the wars. If that isn’t approval, I don’t know what is.

    These things are handled by something called votes. American voters may have forgotten how voting works under the Constitutional system.

  9. says

    War time is it. So terrorists and serial killers at GitMo get 3 halal meals a day, praying time, and luxuries, while US citizens are persecuted by the government because… obviously the US government has been promoting terrorism to such a degree that it now needs to worry about US citizens utilizing their freedom of judgment.

    What kind of “war” is that.

  10. says

    The War Powers act has certain provisions for extended Executive authority. Bush went out of his way to avoid activating it and did not ask Congress to declare the War Powers act legitimate for this conflict.

    If the Democrats do so at this time when the threat is less, their power play will become naked for all to see in their eternal, unwise, greed and ambition.

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