When it comes to North Korea,it’s good to know that our military has its priorities straight

The headlines have been deeply disturbing:  North Korea, led by an unstable 20-something, has reinstated war against the United States and South Korea after a fifty-plus year hiatus in active hostilities.  Admittedly, North Korea hasn’t fired any shots yet, but its rhetorical volleys have been incendiary.  Just yesterday, it cut the single communication line that ran between North and South Korea.

Although the full scope of North Korea’s nuclear capability is a mystery (indeed, the full scope of its entire military is a mystery), we know that it’s spent the last fifty-plus years building weapons aimed at Seoul.  Even if 90% of them are duds (entirely possible given North Korea’s fizzled rocket exercises living standards), the 10% remaining could wreak havoc on the densely populated South Korean peninsula.  Japan would also be in North Korea’s cross hairs.

With the war drums beating, the United States Navy is hard at work keeping a sharp eye on the most significant threat to the United States — climate change.

No, that’s not one of my typos.  That’s really what Navy Admiral Samuel J. Locklear III said.  Even the très liberal Boston Globe seemed taken aback:

America’s top military officer in charge of monitoring hostile actions by North Korea, escalating tensions between China and Japan, and a spike in computer attacks traced to China provides an unexpected answer when asked what is the biggest long-term security threat in the Pacific region: climate change.

Navy Admiral Samuel J. Locklear III, in an interview at a Cambridge hotel Friday after he met with scholars at Harvard and Tufts universities, said significant upheaval related to the warming planet “is probably the most likely thing that is going to happen . . . that will cripple the security environment, probably more likely than the other scenarios we all often talk about.’’

“People are surprised sometimes,” he added, describing the reaction to his assessment. “You have the real potential here in the not-too-distant future of nations displaced by rising sea level. Certainly weather patterns are more severe than they have been in the past. We are on super typhoon 27 or 28 this year in the Western Pacific. The average is about 17.”

Put aside the fact that huge bodies of new, verifiable evidence show that all the hysterical climate models were grossly exaggerated.  Nature is just doing what nature has always done.  But even if you too believe that climate change is imminent and apocalyptic, right now you  need to stay focused on the fact that, with North Korea threatening imminent nuclear hellfire, our Navy is concerned focusing its efforts on hypothetical threats twenty or more years down the line.

Since I’m a big fan of the Navy, I absolutely refuse to believe that Admiral Locklear has drunk that deeply of the Kool-Aid.  This must be some elaborate double-blind technique.  I can think of two sneaky reasons to explain this idiocy:  The first is that the Navy is deliberately ignoring North Korea in order to show that the U.S. is a strong big dog, disinterested in a little dog’s inane yapping.  In other words, Locklear is engaged in an elaborate power play.  The second is that this is a ruse to hide the fact that the U.S. is planning a major and immediate response if North Korea sends so much as a toy dart over the Demilitarized Zone.  Even as the North Koreans think that we’re dumb as rocks, we’re planning a big defense or assault.

I hope I’m right.  Otherwise, our nation is in deep doo-doo.

Hat tip:  Ace of Spades

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  • PierreL

    And what is really fun about that is North Korean might be playing us…they have had nukes for a while. The supposed rocket failurers could also be viewed as successful. Consider this partial snippet of a long article by Dr. Pry, an expert on EMP attacks.
     
    North Korea’s ICBM
    The Obama administration estimates, and the press dutifully reports, that North Korea is still years away from having an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) that can strike the United States. This estimate is based on the assumption that North Korea is seeking a normal ICBM that would deliver an ordinary atomic or nuclear warhead, designed to blast a city, necessitating a heavy re-entry vehicle and heat shield, the missile to be launched on a normal ballistic trajectory for striking a city, and capable of delivering a payload of about one ton (2,000 pounds). According to these estimates, even when North Korea finally perfects its ICBM–some three to five years in the future–it will only have sufficient range to strike Hawaii, Alaska, and maybe the west coast of the U.S. mainland.
    However, North Korea appears to have borrowed more from the Russians than the design of a Super-EMP warhead.
    During the Cold War, the USSR experimented with a secret weapon, the Fractional Orbital Bombardment System (FOBS), that used an ICBM like a Space Launch Vehicle to put a nuclear warhead into orbit, like a satellite. Instead of using the ICBM to lob the warhead on a more accurate arcing ballistic trajectory, flying along the shortest range to target, like an artillery shell, the FOBS lofted the warhead into a “fractional” or partial orbit, sacrificing accuracy for limitless range.
    FOBS could reach any nation or threaten any target anywhere on Earth.
    A Super-EMP warhead does not weigh much, and could probably be delivered by North Korea’s Fractional Orbital Bombardment System, successfully tested in December 2012, against any nation on Earth. Thus, North Korea already possesses an ICBM and poses a mortal nuclear threat to the United States, and to all nations on Earth–right now.
    North Korea, during the successful test of its ICBM on December 12, 2012, orbited a satellite weighing 100 kilograms (about 200 pounds). One design of a Super-EMP warhead would be a modified neutron bomb, more accurately an Enhanced Radiation Warhead (ERW) because it produces not only many neutrons but also many gamma rays. As noted earlier, gamma rays cause the EMP effect. One U.S. ERW warhead (the W-82) deployed in NATO during the Cold War weighed, including its heavy casing, less than 50 kilograms. Since the EMP attack entails detonating the warhead at high-altitude, above the atmosphere, the warhead does not even need a heavy re-entry vehicle and heat shield.
    North Korea’s ICBM does not have to be accurate to make an EMP attack against the United States.
    The EMP field is so large that detonating anywhere over the U.S. would have catastrophic consequences. North Korea orbited its satellite around the Earth at an altitude of about 500 kilometers. The trajectory of North Korea’s satellite is no accident–they deliberately aimed for and achieved this orbit and altitude, as announced before their launch.

  • http://bookwormroom.com Bookworm

    Oh, yay!  (Said with a heavily sarcastic inflection.)  Which is getting to be like a very, very dangerous version of “Get Smart.”

  • PierreL

    Here is the link to the full article…good thing we have the messiah as President or else I would be worried.
     
    http://www.familysecuritymatters.org/publications/detail/understanding-north-korea-and-iran?f=must_reads#ixzz2My1iJEir
     
    Dr. Peter Vincent Pry, Executive Director of the Task Force on National and Homeland Security who advises Congress on the full spectrum of security issues. He is now focused on preventing a nuclear or natural electromagnetic pulse (EMP) catastrophe–the greatest threat now facing civilization.
    Dr. Pry has spent his entire career protecting America from Weapons of Mass Destruction and EMP, first at the Central Intelligence Agency, then at the House Armed Services Committee, on the Congressional EMP Commission and Strategic Posture Commission. He is the author of the new book, Civil-Military Preparedness For An Electromagnetic Pulse Catastrophe, a Kindle e-book available on Amazon.com

  • PierreL

    Here is the link to the full article…good thing we have the messiah as President or else I would be worried. http://www.familysecuritymatters.org/publications/detail/understanding-north-korea-and-iran?f=must_reads#ixzz2My1iJEir Dr. Peter Vincent Pry, Executive Director of the Task Force on National and Homeland Security who advises Congress on the full spectrum of security issues. He is now focused on preventing a nuclear or natural electromagnetic pulse (EMP) catastrophe–the greatest threat now facing civilization.Dr. Pry has spent his entire career protecting America from Weapons of Mass Destruction and EMP, first at the Central Intelligence Agency, then at the House Armed Services Committee, on the Congressional EMP Commission and Strategic Posture Commission. He is the author of the new book, Civil-Military Preparedness For An Electromagnetic Pulse Catastrophe, a Kindle e-book available on Amazon.com

  • Spartacus

    North Korea and Iran:  We have these problems because we choose to have these problems.
     
    What we *need* is Henry V negotiating with the French.
    What we *have* is Arthur negotiating with the French.

  • SADIE

    We’ve come to the fork in the road - no one in charge has a clue what to do with it, other than award medals.
     
    NRO:

    An Air Force chaplain has been awarded a Bronze Star for his service in crafting an especially good PowerPoint about how to treat Islamic religious materials with sensitivity, according to Ohio’s Dayton Daily News. After U.S. troops in Afghanistan accidentally burned copies of the Koran, sparking riots that took over 30 lives, Lieutenant Colonel Jon Trainer came to the rescue:
    After the accidental burning last year of Qurans by U.S. troops in Afghanistan sparked deadly rioting, an Air National Guard chaplain from Springfield stepped in and potentially saved countless American lives.
    For his effort, Lt. Col. Jon Trainer received the prestigious Bronze Star — a medal given for heroic or meritorious achievement in connection with operations against an armed enemy.
    And he did it with a PowerPoint presentation. . . .

  • jj

    The Navy’d be better off with Heather Locklear.
     
    Japan has a great navy, with a lot of capability, systems shared by us, and a closer – and regularly exercised – relationship with the US Navy than anyone, up to and including the Royal Navy.  We may be off in search of melting icebergs, but they’ll be pretty serious about keeping an eye on Fat Boy.

  • PierreL

    The problem is North Korea launches on us by firing off a missile that instead of flying over the artic flies out over the south pole hitting us from the south where we have no sensors. Even our military will have no idea why the lights go out…
     
    EMP is a mortal threat to civilization…and several crazy men now have the ability to launch a strike.

  • http://photoncourier.blogspot.com David Foster

    Occam’s Razor would suggest that the admiral’s comments can be best explained by the technical phrase “sucking up to the boss.”

  • Wolf Howling

    Like virtually every military in the world, flag rank among the U.S. military goes in peacetime to politicians posing in military garb – and those politicians are almost all militarily incompetent.  That is not universally true, a few warriors do end up making it into peacetime flag rank, but that is more the exception than the rule.  My read of history is that it takes the first two years of a war directly involving that branch of the service before the warriors are picked to replace all of the political generals and admiral.
     
    It has pretty much been the same way since the Revolutionary War – with the sole exception being WWII, where George Marshall emptied the flag ranks before the war started and elevated the most competent warriors.  Col. Patton, then set for retirement in the pre-WWII Army before Marshall elevated him, is the most obvious example.
     
    Under Obama, the Navy’s unwritten mission has been changed from war fighting to serving as a primary vehicle for Obama’s global warming push.  The Navy is being forced to purchase grossly overpriced green fuels on a massive scale, and ships are being refitted to use this fuel.  It is no surprise to me at all that an Admiral in Obama’s navy sees global warming as more of a threat than, well, actual threats.  Commenting on the North Korean threat will win him no kudos with the utterly risk averse Obama administration.  Concentrating on global warming will win him another star.
     
    The good news – below flag rank, our military is the most competent in the world at their primary mission, being ready to wage and win an actual war.  

  • PierreL

    The good news – below flag rank, our military is the most competent in the world at their primary mission, being ready to wage and win an actual war.
    Course the bad news is the guys below cannot do anything if the guys above are incompetent…
    With the speed of war these days by the time we flush out the incompetence we might be in dire straits. This assumes that the Commander In Chief isn’t actually intent of failure. Or more correctly perhaps his vision of success is different than ours.

  • http://ymarsakar.wordpress.com Ymarsakar

    The nation won’t be in danger. Those at the front will merely be grinded up a bit for the Left’s pleasure. The greatest danger to the US is inside, not outside.