Dutch symphony orchestra rejects Islam

Muhammed farve. tegning : KWThis is a story that I haven’t seen anywhere else, but there’s video, so it definitely seems to have happened three years ago in Holland. Only now, though, does the video seem to be gaining some traction. A Muslim symphony conductor, who seems to be a native Dutch speaker, when appearing in a performance before the Queen of Holland, felt called upon to lecture everyone about Islam’s beauty.  The symphony orchestra politely walked out.

Ironically, the conductor keeps saying, “There’s no bomb here.” Moreover, he was polite in manner, if not in context or content, so it didn’t appear that anyone was in imminent danger.  The symphony members, though, understood that there was indeed a bomb in that concert hall. Islam is a bomb.

(Incidentally, had the conductor rhapsodized about his faith in Jesus, that statement would have been equally misplaced, but no one would have mistaken it for a veiled demand that their culture come to an end.)

The Tunisia massacre — I once stood in that very spot

Mosaic in the Bardo Museum, Tunis

Mosaic in the Bardo Museum, Tunis

I was horrified to read about the massacre in Tunisia.  If you haven’t heard about it yet, here are some of the details:

Gunmen in military uniforms stormed Tunisia’s national museum, killing 17 foreign tourists and two Tunisians on Wednesday in one of the worst militant attacks in a country that has largely escaped the region’s “Arab Spring” turmoil.

Visitors from Italy, Germany, Poland and Spain were among the dead in the noon assault on the Bardo museum near parliament in central Tunis, Prime Minister Habib Essid said.

Security forces stormed the former palace around two hours later, killed two militants and freed other tourists held hostage inside, a government spokesman said. One policeman was killed in the police operation.

[snip]

Television footage showed dozens of people, including elderly foreigners and one man carrying a child, running for shelter in the compound, covered by security forces aiming rifles into the air.

I’m always horrified, of course, when I read about Islamic massacres, but this one struck particularly close to home.  In August 2011, my family and I were on a cruise ship tour of Tunis which included the Bardo Museum.  I wrote about it then (emphasis added):

Speaking of girls, women have full legal rights in Tunisia. They can hold the same jobs (we saw a lot of female police officers), get equal pay for equal work, and divorce their husbands. Polygamy is illegal. Unsurprisingly, despite a Muslim majority, church and state are separate, and both Christians and Jews are allowed to worship freely.

It’s this secularism, I think, that explains the civility of Tunisia’s revolution. As best as I can tell, once the Tunisians got rid of the enormously corrupt ruling family (which secreted at least 25 billion dollars in offshore accounts), the Tunisian people had accomplished their goal. Right now, they’re awaiting October 23, when they have free elections. It might be a bit confusing, though, as they have 102 parties running!

Today, a mere half year after the revolution, Tunis seemed peaceful — indeed, somnolent, although that last impression may have come to me because of the punishing heat, which hovered around 110 degrees. The whole place is bleached white by the sun. The sky is white; the myriad low, boxy buildings are white; and even the dirt and dust are a pale tan.

The people we saw were friendly, pushy in a very Middle Eastern suk way, and desperate for their life’s blood– tourism. Because of the revolution, their tourist trade has collapsed, and many of them asked us to put out the word that Tunisia is a safe place for the return of tourism. Certainly, under the aegis of a rather stodgy cruise ship tour, we felt very safe indeed.

[snip]

Our next stop was the best one: a museum that houses the biggest collection of Roman mosaics I’ve ever seen [that was the Bardo]. In room after overheated room, every surface was covered with these vibrant mosaics. I wish we could have stayed longer, but the guide had his own schedule.

This is another reminder, as if we needed it, that Islamism is a fast-moving, deadly plague, and that, especially in the Middle East and environs, no one is safe and no institution is immune.

The Bookworm Beat 3-5-15 — “I’m still standing” edition and open thread

Woman writingLast year I had virtually no work; this year, if the pace keeps up, I’ll be working almost full time. Frankly, I preferred no work.

Fortunately — and the lawyers amongst you will appreciate this — I’m getting access to Westlaw again, and won’t be trapped in Lexis hell. When it comes to Westlaw, it’s a brilliant interface and I feel like a brilliant practitioner when I use it.

I’m not going to stop blogging, though, just because of a little legal work.  I’ve been collecting interesting information, and now I get to share it with you:

Obama’s misguided (or evil) efforts to spin his Middle Eastern failures as successes

I’ve been trying to have a more optimistic view of things in my life lately, along the lines of “when life hands you lemons, make lemonade.” Traffic tickets are an opportunity to be a better driver. Joint problems are a reminder to repair my body before old-age makes doing so impossible. Things like that — seeing problems as opportunities for improvement.

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The Bookworm Beat 2-23-15 — Post-Vegas edition and Open Thread

Woman writingI do like Vegas. I love its manic energy, crazed corporate imagination, over-the-top shows, brilliant colors, and flashing lights. And then, after three days, I’m desperate to get away from the noise and smoke and, often, the desperation floating above the casino floors. In other words, I had a great trip there and then was glad to come home again. This time, coming home also meant going through about 800 backed-up emails (a lot of people got heartfelt apologies from me for delaying so long before responding to them), and finding some awesome things to share with you.

A glowing French eye-view of American troops

When we think of the French, we tend to think of hyper-critical people who look down upon Americans. That stereotype might be true on the Île-de-France, but it turns out to be untrue in the theater of war, at least as to one French soldier who served with American troops (Echo Company) in Afghanistan. If this doesn’t make you want to stand up and salute, I truly don’t know what will:

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When the fanatics take control….

Muslims against ISISI received the following email, thought it was interesting, and want to pass it on:

A man, whose family was German aristocracy prior to World War II, owned a number of large industries and estates. When asked how many German people were true Nazis, the answer he gave can guide our attitude toward fanaticism.

“Very few people were true Nazis,” he said, “but many enjoyed the return of German pride, and many more were too busy to care. I was one of those who just thought the Nazis were a bunch of fools. So, the majority just sat back and let it all happen. Then, before we knew it, they owned us, and we had lost control, and the end of the world had come. My family lost everything. I ended up in a concentration camp and the Allies destroyed my factories.”

We are told again and again by “experts” and “talking heads” that Islam is the religion of peace and that the vast majority of Muslims just want to live in peace. Although this unqualified assertion is surely true, it is entirely irrelevant. It is meaningless fluff, meant to make us feel better, and meant to somehow diminish the spectre of fanatics rampaging across the globe in the name of Islam.

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The Bookworm Beat 2-19-15 — A few links for your reading pleasure

Woman writingI’m still away from my blog, so I’m not blogging in real time, but in un-real time. I lined up this post several days ago and, for all I know, world events shifted so dramatically, everything here is entirely obsolete. Still, FWIW, you may enjoy these stories:

Roger L. Simon has been on fire lately. I’ve always liked his writing, but lately I’ve loved his writing. His riff on the murders in Cophenhagen is a fine bit of snark aimed at people at home and abroad who deny Islam’s role in terrorism, not to mention antisemitism’s role in Islam.

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If you read just one article today about ISIS, read Graeme Wood’s “What ISIS Really Wants”

Why is militant Islam Like EbolaI can’t imagine that you’ve traveled anywhere across the conservative internet today without coming across a link to Graeme Wood’s “What ISIS Really Wants.” It’s a long article, but so informative and important that it would be a good thing if everybody took a few minutes out of their day to read it.  Indeed, I’d make everyone in Obama’s administration read it often enough to have it memorized.

A lot of what Wood has to say is familiar to all of us who haven’t been pretending that ISIS is just a JV Team of malcontents taking the name of Allah in vain. Wood destroys any claim that ISIS isn’t Islamic:

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The difference between the Muslim conquests and the Crusades, in a single picture

You and I know that, had Obama seen this picture before the Prayer Breakfast, he wouldn’t have changed his speech by a single syllable. Facts are irrelevant. They must always bow before dogma. But to those of us who like facts, this picture is amazing:

Muslim conquest v Crusade battles

The above, of course, perfectly represents the Bernard Lewis quotation that’s getting so much air time lately:

I would not wish to defend the behavior of the Crusaders, which was in many respects atrocious. But let us have a little sense of proportion. We are now expected to believe that the Crusades were an unwarranted act of aggression against a peaceful Muslim world. Hardly. The first papal call for a crusade occurred in 846 C.E., when an Arab expedition from Sicily sailed up the Tiber and sacked St. Peter’s in Rome. A synod in France issued an appeal to Christian sovereigns to rally against “the enemies of Christ,” and the pope, Leo IV, offered a heavenly reward to those who died fighting the Muslims. A century and a half and many battles later, in 1096, the Crusaders actually arrived in the Middle East. The Crusades were a late, limited, and unsuccessful imitation of the jihad—an attempt to recover by holy war what had been lost by holy war. It failed, and it was not followed up.

Hat tip: A friend who directed me to Dinesh D’Souza’s Facebook page

The Bookworm Beat 2-6-15 — the “Fearless Friday” edition and Open Thread

Woman writingObama’s adversarial relationship with Christianity

What did we expect already from yesterday’s Prayer Breakfast? Obama long ago put the world on notice that he’s going full Bulworth (i.e., after six years in office, he intends, finally, to stop lying and speak the truth).

While before Obama just let out peevish little trickles of animosity, anyone paying attention could tell that:

(a) he’s profoundly ignorant about history — not just American history, but any history, including Muslim and Christian history;

(b) he hates Christians and Christianity;

(c) he hates America, no matter that this nation twice elected him as president (with a little help from the IRS, of course); and

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